In USDA's Words: June 2013 Acreage Report

June 28, 2013 06:13 AM
 

 

 

 

Corn Planted Acreage Up Slightly from 2012
Soybean Acreage Up 1 Percent
All Wheat Acreage Up 1 Percent
All Cotton Acreage Down 17 Percent

Corn planted area for all purposes in 2013 is estimated at 97.4 million acres, up slightly from last year. This represents the highest planted acreage in the United States since 1936 when an estimated 102 million acres were planted. Growers expect to harvest 89.1 million acres for grain, up 2 percent from last year.

Soybean planted area for 2013 is estimated at a record high 77.7 million acres, up 1 percent from last year. Area for harvest, at 76.9 million acres, is up 1 percent from 2012 and will be a record high, if realized. Record high planted acreage is estimated in New York, Pennsylvania, and South Dakota.

All wheat planted area for 2013 is estimated at 56.5 million acres, up 1 percent from 2012. The 2013 winter wheat planted area, at 42.7 million acres, is 3 percent above last year and up 2 percent from the previous estimate. Of this total, about 29.4 million acres are Hard Red Winter, 9.96 million acres are Soft Red Winter, and 3.38 million acres are White Winter. Area planted to other spring wheat for 2013 is estimated at 12.3 million acres, up slightly from 2012. Of this total, about 11.7 million acres are Hard Red Spring wheat. The estimated Durum wheat planted area for 2013 is estimated at 1.54 million acres, down 28 percent from the previous year.

All cotton planted area for 2013 is estimated at 10.3 million acres, 17 percent below last year. Upland area is estimated at 10.0 million acres, down 17 percent from 2012. American Pima area is estimated at 226,000 acres, down 5 percent from 2012.

Crop Comments

Corn: The 2013 corn planted area for all purposes is estimated at 97.4 million acres, up slightly from last year. This represents the highest planted acreage in the United States since 1936 when an estimated 102 million acres were planted. Record corn acreage is estimated in Arizona, Nevada, North Dakota, and Oregon. Growers expect to harvest 89.1 million acres for grain, up 2 percent from last year. Farmers responding to the survey indicated 97 percent of the intended corn acreage had been planted at the time of the interview compared with the 10-year average of 98 percent.

The planting of this year's corn crop was significantly delayed by cold and wet conditions across much of the major corn-producing region. Showers received during April aided soil moisture levels, however, wet soils and cool temperatures prevented fieldwork throughout much of the Midwest. By April 28, only 5 percent of the corn crop was planted, 44 percentage points behind last year and 26 percentage points behind the 5-year average. This represented the slowest planting pace since 1984.

As May began, cool, wet weather continued to hamper fieldwork throughout much of the major corn-producing regions, allowing producers only small windows of favorable conditions to plant this year's crop. Warmer temperatures and lighter precipitation returned mid-month allowing producers in many areas ample time for fieldwork during the week ending May 19, evidenced by record-tying planting progress of 43 percentage points that week. Similarly, double-digit emergence occurred in 13 of the 18 major estimating States during the same week. In portions of the Corn Belt, planting gained speed toward months' end. Acres planted during the week ending May 26 jumped ahead of normal in six of the 18 major estimating States. Nationwide, 91 percent of this year's corn crop was planted by June 2, nine percentage points behind last year and 4 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Seventy-four percent of the crop had emerged, 22 percentage points behind last year and 8 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Overall, 63 percent of the corn crop was reported in good to excellent condition on June 2, compared with 72 percent at the same time last year.

Producers planted 90 percent of their acreage with seed varieties developed using biotechnology, up 2 percent from 2012. Varieties containing bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were planted on 5 percent of the acreage, down 10 percentage points from last year. Herbicide resistant varieties developed using biotechnology were planted on 14 percent of the acreage, down 7 percentage points from 2012. Stacked gene varieties, those containing both insect and herbicide resistance, were planted on 71 percent of the acreage, up 19 percentage points from a year ago.

As of June 23, ninety-two percent of the crop had been planted, 2 percentage points behind last year but 2 percentage points ahead of the 5-year average. Fifty-four percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition on June 23, compared with 44 percent at the same time last year.

Soybeans: The 2013 soybean planted area is estimated at a record high 77.7 million acres, up 1 percent from last year. Compared with last year, planted area increased in 18 out of 31 States. Area for harvest, at 76.9 million acres, is up 1 percent from 2012 and will be a record high, if realized.

Planting conditions this spring were much worse than last year as cool and wet conditions delayed planting in many areas of the Corn Belt and Delta. Planting of this year's soybean crop wasn't underway in all 18 major States until mid-May. As of May 26, only 44 percent of the intended soybean crop had been planted, 43 percentage points behind last year's pace and 17 percentage points behind normal. During the first part of June, conditions did allow good progress to be made in many areas, and by June 16, soybean planting had reached 85 percent complete, 13 percentage points behind last year's pace and 6 percentage points behind normal. However, planting progress at that time still lagged behind normal by 15 percentage points or more in Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Wisconsin.

Fourteen percent of the soybean crop had emerged by May 26, forty-three percentage points behind last year's pace and 16 percentage points behind normal. Emergence advanced to 66 percent by June 16, with progress in all 18 major States behind the 5-year average with the exception of Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio, and was 25 percentage points or more behind normal in Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin.

Producers planted 93 percent of the 2013 soybean acreage to herbicide resistant seed varieties, unchanged from 2012.

Winter wheat: The 2013 winter wheat planted area is estimated at 42.7 million acres, up 2 percent from the previous estimate and up 3 percent from 2012. Nationally, more acres were seeded due in part to an early row crop harvest. All Soft Red Winter growing States increased planted acres except Delaware and Louisiana. Planted acres are estimated at a record high level in North Carolina. Of the total acreage, about 29.4 million acres are Hard Red Winter, 9.96 million acres are Soft Red Winter, and 3.38 million acres are White Winter. Winter wheat conditions improved over the winter in much of the Hard Red Winter growing area.

Area harvested for grain is forecast at 32.3 million acres, down 7 percent from last year. Harvested acres are down significantly in the Great Plains. Conversely, increases are expected throughout the Soft Red Winter growing region due to much more favorable growing conditions compared with the Hard Red Winter region. If realized, harvested acres will be a record high in North Carolina.

Excessive moisture across both Hard Red and Soft Red growing regions temporarily halted the start of harvest. As of June 23, harvest was 20 percent complete, 17 percentage points behind the 5-year average pace. Harvest in Kansas, the leading producing State, was 8 percent complete at that time, 31 percentage points behind normal.

Durum wheat: Area seeded to Durum wheat is estimated at 1.54 million acres, down 28 percent from 2012. Planted acreage is estimated to be down in all producing States except South Dakota. North Dakota area planted and to be planted is estimated at 850,000 acres, a decrease of 37 percent from last year. This represents the third-smallest North Dakota Durum wheat acreage on record. Area harvested for grain is expected to total 1.50 million acres, 29 percent below 2012. As of June 2, crop emergence stood at 25 percent in Montana and 30 percent in North Dakota, both significantly behind the 5-year average.

Other spring wheat: Area seeded to other spring wheat is estimated at 12.3 million acres, up slightly from 2012. Of the total, about 11.7 million acres are Hard Red Spring wheat. Harvested area is expected to total 12.0 million acres, 1 percent below 2012. Crop development has been behind normal this spring primarily due to excessive moisture. By May 26, forty-two percent of the crop had emerged in the six major spring wheat-producing States, 24 percentage points behind the 5-year average. As of June 23, seventy percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition, compared with 77 percent at the same time last year.

Cotton: Area planted to cotton in 2013 is estimated at 10.3 million acres, down 17 percent from last year. Upland area is estimated at 10.0 million acres, down 17 percent from 2012. American Pima area is estimated at 226,000 acres, down 5 percent from 2012. Planted area estimates in Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Oklahoma are all record lows.

Cotton planting in Arizona and California progressed quickly this spring while most other cotton growing regions lagged behind normal. However, favorable weather throughout late-May allowed quicker progress and by June 2, eighty-two percent of the crop had been planted, just 1 percentage point behind the 5-year average. By June 23, twenty-three percent of the crop was squaring, 11 percentage points behind last year and 6 percentage points behind the 5-year average. As of June 23, forty-three percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition, compared with 50 percent rated in these two categories at the same time last year.

Producers planted 90 percent of their acreage with seed varieties developed using biotechnology, down 4 percentage points from last year. Varieties containing bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were planted on 8 percent of the acreage, down 6 percentage points from last year. Herbicide resistant varieties were planted on 15 percent of the acreage, down 2 percentage points from 2012. Stacked gene varieties, those containing both insect and herbicide resistance, were planted on 67 percent of the acreage, up 4 percentage points from a year ago.
 

Oats: Area seeded to oats for the 2013 crop year is estimated at 3.03 million acres, up 10 percent from 2012. This represents the third-lowest United States planted area on record. Record low acreage is expected in North Carolina, South Carolina, Texas, and Virginia. Growers expect to harvest 1.20 million acres, up 14 percent from last year but the third lowest harvested acreage on record. Record low harvested acreage is expected in Iowa, Kansas, North Carolina, Ohio, South Carolina, and Virginia.

Oat seeding was well underway by March 31 with 32 percent of the Nation's crop sown. By May 12, seventy percent of the crop was seeded, 15 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Nationally, oat emergence also followed a slower than normal pace. As of June 9, heading was running behind normal in most of the major oat-producing States. As of June 23, fifty-seven percent of the crop was rated in good to excellent condition compared with 69 percent at the same time last year.


 

 

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