Missouri Farmer Charged With Illegal Use of Dicamba

November 21, 2018 10:29 AM
 
A southeast Missouri farmer has been indicted on federal charges of illegally applying dicamba and damaging crops in neighboring fields.

By JIM SALTER, Associated Press

ST. LOUIS (AP) — A southeast Missouri farmer has been indicted on federal charges of illegally applying dicamba and damaging crops in neighboring fields.

A 53-count federal indictment was announced Tuesday against Bobby David Lowrey, 51, of Parma. He is accused of illegally applying dicamba on his cotton and soybean crops outside of Environmental Protection Agency guidelines , and lying to investigators when confronted about it.

Lowrey does not have a listed attorney who can speak on his behalf. A phone number for his home is no longer in service.

"Although weed killers like Dicamba have been around for decades, it is critical that applicators follow manufacturer instructions when applying them," EPA Special Agent in Charge Jeffrey Martinez said in a statement. "The misuse of this product has resulted in significant crop damage at neighboring farms."

The indictment said crops planted by Lowrey in 2016, which cover 6,700 acres, were modified to be resistant to dicamba. Federal prosecutors say Lowrey didn't follow the rules and then lied when the Missouri Department of Agriculture investigated after neighboring farmers reported crop damage. The indictment alleges Lowrey applied dicamba to cotton after planting and over the top on soybeans and then presented false spray records to investigators.

Lowrey faces 49 counts of misapplication of a pesticide, three counts of obstruction of justice, and one count of making a false statement. He could face up to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine if convicted.
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Comments

 
Spell Check

Mike
Nya, MN
11/26/2018 11:00 PM
 

  Why does my corn next to beans look so bad

 
 
Dan B
INDEPENDENCE, MO
11/26/2018 03:29 PM
 

  Of course, he did this in 2016...just part of an independent group who bet that the "regulations" on dicamba use were just a conspiracy by the government to make things harder on him. Bet that he didn't do it in 2017 or 2018...but who knows. A followup article about the plea and settlement, trial if there is one, could be very informative. Don't Tread On Me (unless I bet and lose).

 
 
dave
auburn, IN
11/26/2018 11:22 AM
 

  I agree 100 % , hope all the crops that he damaged for farmers , he will pay all damages due

 
 

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