Representatives: More Analysis of GIPSA Needed

October 5, 2010 04:23 AM
 

USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack received a bipartisan letter on Oct. 4, 2010, from 115 members of the U.S. House of Representatives calling for a comprehensive economic analysis of a proposed rule on livestock and poultry marketing under the Packers and Stockyards Act.

The proposed rule, released by USDA’s Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) in June, was in response to a request made by Congress. However, many elected leaders note that the rule goes above and beyond the intent of Congress.

“In the 2008 Farm Bill, Congress directed the Department (USDA) to promulgate a discrete set of regulations under the Packers and Stockyards Act. However, in doing so, GIPSA also included additional proposed regulations that greatly exceed the mandate of the Farm Bill,” according to the letter. “Such a broad rule that extends so far beyond Congress’ direction in the Farm Bill and that would precipitate major changes in livestock and poultry marketing requires a vigorous economic analysis. The analysis contained in the proposed rule fails to demonstrate the need for the rule, assess the impact of its implementation on the marketplace, or establish how the implementation of the rule would address the demonstrated need.” 

The letter was led by House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson (D-Minn.); Ranking Member Frank Lucas (R-Okla.), Livestock Subcommittee Chairman David Scott (D-Ga.) and Livestock Subcommittee Ranking Member Randy Neugebauer (R-Texas).

Click here to read letter.


Source: National Cattlemen's Beef Association

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