Resources to Get You through Harvest

November 1, 2009 06:00 PM
 

Sara Schafer, AgWeb Crops Online Editor
 
An incredibly slow harvest, excessive moisture, high potential for diseases and other crop quality issues have created many obstacles for your corn's path from field to bin or elevator. To help overcome these difficulties, here are six of the best harvest information sources. Your field-loss, grain-drying, field-ruts and disease questions will be answered.
 
This Excel spreadsheet allows producers to calculate the influence of harvesting today versus allowing the crop to stand in the field and harvesting later. It accounts for higher drying costs versus grain losses during field drying. It allows the user to account for elevator discounts and grain shrink.
 
University of Wisconsin
 
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By Charles R. Hurburgh, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
The difficult harvest has not gotten any easier. With most of the corn and still a significant percentage of soybeans still in the field, several management questions have come up very often.
 
Iowa State University
 
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Drying high-moisture corn requires extra care.
Moisture content, airflow rates, drying temperatures and the drying method used all affect the quality of the dried corn, according to North Dakota State University grain-drying expert Ken Hellevang.
 
North Dakota State University 
 
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By Mark Hanna, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, and Madhi Al-Kaisi, Department of Agronomy
Combines working in wet conditions to harvest crops have formed ruts in fields.  About three-fourths of combine mass and virtually all of loaded grain tank weight are carried on the combine front axle.  With good yields, grain tank extensions, and a 12-row head, front axle load can be 18 to 20 tons. 
 
Iowa State University
 
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Resources for Drying, Storing, Grain Quality, Crop Insurance and Marketing
Purdue University Field Crops Team
The combination of delayed planting, a cool summer, an early freeze in some areas and a rainy fall has created a harvest situation not seen for many years. This guide provides information on a variety of key management issues designed to help farmers make decisions related to harvesting, storing, and marketing 2009 fall crops.
 
Purdue University
 
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By Alison Robertson and Gary Munkvold, Department of Plant Pathology
The corn harvest is later than it has been any time in recent memory, and the prolonged moist conditions are conducive for molds to develop on grain in the field. Over the past few days we have received numerous reports of ear rots developing in the field and questions concerning mycotoxin production when conditions are cool but wet.
 
Iowa State University
 

 
You can e-mail Sara Schafer at sschafer@farmjournal.com.
 
 

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