SE Nebraska Crops More Mature, Corn Shows Pest Challenges

03:34PM Aug 20, 2019
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“We’re finding decent corn out here in Nebraska,” says Emily Carolan, Pro Farmer Crop Tour scout who works for Corteva Agriscience’s Pioneer. “As you move east, they’re finding more disease pressure and stand issues.”
( Pro Farmer Crop Tour Scouts )

Pro Farmer Crop Tour scouts south of the Platte River in Nebraska are seeing more filled pods and corn in the dough- and dent-stages. This is a far cry from the immature, unfilled pods and barely pollinated corn they saw in the northern part of the state and South Dakota yesterday.

“We’re finding decent corn out here in Nebraska,” says Emily Carolan, Pro Farmer Crop Tour scout who works for Corteva Agriscience’s Pioneer. “As you move east, they’re finding more disease pressure and stand issues.”

With the flooding that occurred this year near the river, she says she’s unsurprised that there’s more disease pressure and poorer stands. She is surprised, though, that she’s seen more weed and chemical challenges in corn fields than in soybean fields.

Evidence of a challenging spring is rearing its ugly head. Variability is evident—Carolan says in back-to-back samples she set the high, 228 bu. per acre, and the low, 110 bu. per acre, for corn yields.

“You can tell when a field was planted when it shouldn’t have been—you can tell things were rushed,” Carolan says. “Last year we were looking at a crop that could only get better. This year I truly believe it’s an immature crop so we’re measuring the best-case scenario.”

There are still many factors yet to be decided in this immature corn crop. Soybeans still have a long way to go, too, and pod counts have been consistent, according to AgriTalk Host Chip Flory.

“Pod counts were consistent and consistently good south of the Platte River,” Flory says. “This field is the first one we’ve run into disease. It’s got white mold and lodging.”

With mostly clean of disease soybeans, the crops in southern Nebraska are painting a more positive picture for the state than what scouts saw yesterday.

“South of the Platte we’re OK,” Flory says. “Really, north of Norfolk is where you run into [maturity] issues. There we need another 45 days [with good conditions].”


Find complete Crop Tour route reports, market analysis and historical comparisons at ProFarmer.com.


Follow along with the week's coverage:

Crop Tour: Nebraska Soybeans “Average” to “Below-Average”

‘Low Numbers and High Emotions’ Showcased at #PFtour19

Crop Tour Scouts Prepare for Rain, Inconsistent Fields in East Leg

Crop Tour: South Dakota and Ohio Yields Plummet with Poor Planting

Inconsistent, Sparse Fields Plague South Dakota

Soybeans Have a Long Way to Go in South Dakota

Corn Needs Extra Two to Three Weeks to Beat Frost

Grete: Immature Crops to Present Challenge in Ohio

‘Sobering’ Sights Greet #PFTour19 Scouts

Is There Time For Ohio Crops To Overcome Unprecedented Immaturity?

Scouts Find What Farmers Already Knew: Variability Plagues Ohio

Chip Nebraska wrap