Small Changes, Hope for Big Difference

Small Changes, Hope for Big Difference

By utilizing precision techniques, one Nebraska farmer is improving her farm by making the most of what she has available.

Nebraska farmer, Tracy Zink, doesn’t typically start planting until after April 1. This year, however, that just wasn’t the case.

In fact, due to ideal planting conditions, they started a few days ahead of schedule. As a result, all the corn and beans are in the ground with only a little milo to go. While this is certainly earlier than Tracy is used to, she notes, in recent years, it seems the whole season has moved up.

Trying some new techniques, last year, Tracy added in-furrow fertilizer to her 16-row planter. “I think we saw a bonus with that,“ she said.

This year, after attending Farm Journal Nutrient College, she also added a side-by-side system on her 8-row planter with the hope of achieving the same results discussed during the Nutrient College event.

Being in one of the dryer areas of Nebraska, Tracy also decided to plant milo this growing season. Her hope is, due to moisture concerns, the milo will allow her to farm something rather than watch everything dry up and die if this drying trend continues.

Among other new precision techniques, Tracy purchased an EM sled to gather information for variable rate irrigation. “I think we’ll see some real positive out of that,” she notes.


Listen to the full interview with Nebraska farmer Tracy Zink on Straight from the Heartland:


Listen to more Straight from the Heartland with Pam Fretwell.

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