Southern Plains Winter Wheat Conditions Improve Slightly in February

February 27, 2012 09:20 AM
 

According to state crop reports, the hard red winter wheat crops in the Southern Plains improved slightly last month, with the most marked improvement noted in Oklahoma.

 

 

Crop condition
Very Poor
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Kansas -
02/27/12
3
8
37
45
7
01/29/12
3
9
39
42
7
 
Okla. - 02/27/12
1
6
26
53
14
1/30/12
1
8
37
47
7
 
Texas - 02/27/12
18
25
26
23
8
01/30/12
15
23
36
22
4

 

Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: High winds combined with below average precipitation in the western third of the State continued to have an impact on the wheat coming out of dormancy in those areas. The Kansas wheat condition improved slightly from January due to the mild winter temperatures and much needed precipitation and was rated 3 percent very poor, 8 percent poor, 37 percent fair, 45 percent good, and 7 percent excellent. This is much better than a year ago, when the condition of the crop was 17 percent very poor, 23 percent poor, 35 percent fair, 23 percent good, and 2 percent excellent. Wind damage increased slightly from January with 9 percent light and 2 percent moderate, while freeze damage was unchanged at 4 percent light and 96 percent with no damage.

Oklahoma: The conditions of small grains and canola improved over the past month with a majority now rated in good condition. The good condition of the crops made continued grazing possible on a larger portion of the small grain crop than in previous years. However, a warmer than normal winter has allowed wheat to develop ahead of normal, so producers are beginning to pull cattle off of wheat that will be harvested this summer. Temperatures averaged in the low 40’s, but extremes were felt on both ends of the scale. A low of eight degrees was recorded in Jay on February 12th and Antlers reached 79 degrees on the 23rd. Rainfall totals for the month of February averaged slightly above normal for the state with 1.72 inches. The heaviest rains fell in the North Central district with a high of 4.94 inches in Freedom. The southern half of the state had below normal precipitation for the month. The Drought Monitor changed very little over the past month, with 66 percent of the state in a moderate to exceptional drought as of February 21st. Continued rains are needed to replenish subsoil moisture as well as lakes and stock ponds. Any improvements in crop and pasture conditions are contingent on continued precipitation. Topsoil moisture conditions improved slightly with 59 percent rated adequate to surplus. Subsoil moisture conditions improved and are now rated mostly adequate to short, although 29 percent of the state was still rated very short on subsoil moisture. Conditions of wheat and other fall planted crops were rated mostly good, with 14 percent of wheat and 12 percent of canola rated excellent, respectively. Wheat grazed was 45 percent of the crop, 11 points above the five-year average.

Texas: Texas received rainfall in most areas of the state last week with rainfall totals mostly ranging from 0.01 to 3 inches. The Panhandle and West Texas received little or no precipitation while strong winds further reduced soil moisture. Winter wheat suffered from dry conditions in the High Plains. In North and Central Texas, small grains benefited from precipitation and warm temperatures, with some producers reporting that wheat and oats were maturing ahead of schedule.


 

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