State Crop Reports Reflect Dire Need for Rain

July 17, 2012 12:30 AM
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

Iowa: Although Iowa received scattered showers during the week, the bulk of the week was dry and sunny. Both corn and soybean crop conditions deteriorated as high temperatures and below normal precipitation continued to take a toll. The week’s activities included spraying crops and cutting hay, with some farmers starting their third cutting. There were 6.7 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the past week. Topsoil moisture levels declined to 58 percent very short, 34 percent short, 8 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. South Central Iowa is the driest with 99 percent of the topsoil moisture rated short to very short. Subsoil moisture dropped to 48 percent very short, 41 percent short, 11 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Eighty-seven percent of the corn crop is at or beyond the tasseling stage, ahead of last year’s 41 percent and the five-year average of 43 percent. Seventy-four percent of the corn crop is silking, ahead of last year’s 23 percent and the five-year average of 27 percent. Reports show corn has reached the dough stage in each district. Corn condition is reported at 8 percent very poor, 19 percent poor, 37 percent fair, 32 percent good, and 4 percent excellent. Seventy-four percent of the soybean crop is blooming, ahead of both last year and five-year average of 54 percent. Pods are being set on 12 percent of the soybean crop, ahead of last year’s four percent and the five-year average of nine percent. Soybean condition is rated 5 percent very poor, 15 percent poor, 42 percent fair, 34 percent good, and 4 percent excellent.

Illinois: The hot, dry weather continued to prevail over much of the state again this week with a few areas experiencing spotty showers. Statewide temperatures averaged 78.2 degrees, 1.8 above normal. Precipitation averaged 0.53 inches across the state, 0.31 inches below normal. Topsoil moisture continued to worsen and was rated at 73 percent very short, 25 percent short and only 2 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture also continued to be a concern, rated 70 percent very short, 26 percent short and only 4 percent adequate. Corn silked has reached 93 percent, compared to 52 percent last year and the 5-year average of 53 percent. Corn in the dough stage was at 20 percent, compared to 3 percent last year and the 5-year average of 6 percent. Corn conditions continued declining and were rated at 26 percent very poor, 30 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 10 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Seventy percent of the soybean crop is now blooming, compared to 37 percent last year and the 5-year average of 42 percent. Fifteen percent of the soybean crop has begun setting pods, compared to 7 percent last year and the 5-year average of 8 percent. Soybean conditions were rated at 16 percent very poor, 25 percent poor, 42 percent fair, 16 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Nebraska: For the week ending July 15, 2012, dryland crops and pastures continued under stress due to hot and dry conditions blanketing the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Irrigation remains active; however some producers using surface water supplies were required to stop pumping due to low river levels. Seventy percent of the corn crop was silking and nearly two-thirds of the soybean crop is blooming. The first sorghum fields were heading out. Wheat harvest was near completion about 3 weeks ahead of average. With declining conditions, some livestock are being removed from summer pastures to dry lots or are being sold. Temperatures moderated and ranged from 2 degrees above normal in the western half of the state to 2 degrees below normal in the eastern half. Highs reached triple digits in portions of the west and lows were recorded in the mid 50’s. Isolated areas across the mid section of the state received measureable rainfall with a few locations accumulating over one inch. However, much of the state saw little to no precipitation.

Corn silked was 70 percent, compared to 27 last year and over one week ahead of 38 average. Corn in the dough stage was 8 percent, compared to 1 last year and 2 average. Corn conditions declined and rated 9 percent very poor, 18 poor, 30 fair, 39 good, and 4 excellent, well below last year’s 82 percent good to excellent and 79 average. Irrigated corn conditions rated 63 percent good to excellent and dryland corn rated 16. Soybeans blooming were 64 percent, ahead of 35 last year and 11 days ahead of 42 average. Soybeans setting pods was 13 percent, ahead of 2 last year and 5 average. Soybean conditions rated 7 percent very poor, 16 poor, 43 fair, 33 good, and 1 excellent, well below last year’s 81 percent good to excellent and 77 average.

Missouri: Corn crop condition declined precipitously while soybeans hung on for a good rain. Although there were widely scattered showers across the eastern 2/3 of the state, continued dry weather allowed 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork. Although unthinkable, topsoil moisture declined to 84 percent very short, 14 percent short, and 2 percent adequate. Creek beds, streams, and pools were dry. Subsoil moisture followed suit with 78 percent very short, 20 percent short, and 2 percent adequate. Corn silked was 88 percent, 12 days ahead of last year, and 15 days ahead of normal. Corn dough stage and beyond was 43 percent, 15 days ahead of last year, and 17 days ahead of normal. Corn dented 12 percent, 16 days ahead of last year, and 18 days ahead of normal. Corn condition was 38 percent very poor, 34 percent poor, 21 percent fair, 6 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. The northeast, west-central, central, and southwest districts rated 80 percent or greater poor and very poor. A portion of the corn meant to be harvested for grain, will be cut for silage due to the low yield and to meet the growing demand for livestock feed. Soybeans blooming and beyond were 45 percent, 1 week ahead of 2011 and 10 days ahead of normal. Soybeans setting pods and beyond were 7 percent, 4 days ahead of last year, and 5 days ahead of normal. Soybean condition was 25 percent very poor, 34 percent poor, 31 percent fair, 9 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. The northwest and central districts rated 70 percent poor and very poor, followed by the north-central district at 60 percent poor and very poor.

Ohio: The average temperature for the State was 75.2 degrees, 1.8 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, July 15, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.27 inches, 0.71 inches below normal. There were 155 modified growing degree days, 5 days below normal. Reporters rated 6.8 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, July 13, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 63 percent very short, 31 percent short, 6 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Conditions throughout the state are hot and dry, which has continued to put significant stress on both crops and livestock. There has been some rain this week, most has been spotty and duration short. Field activities for the week were baling hay, harvesting oats, spraying, mowing CRP, and manure application to wheat fallow acres. As of Sunday July 15th, 67 percent of corn was silked (tasseled), which was 62 percent ahead of last year and 38 percent ahead of the five-year average. Corn in dough was rated at three percent, two percent ahead of the five-year average. The soybean crop was 60 percent blooming, compared to 9 percent last year and 39 percent for the five-year average. Six percent of the soybean acreage was setting pods, which was five percent ahead of last year and one percent ahead of the five-year average.

Indiana: Severe to exceptional drought has spanned across 80 percent of the state with only some northwestern and southeastern areas in slightly better condition, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Farmers in 55 counties now qualify for assistance after their Farm Service Agency (FSA) declared 36 counties as natural disaster areas and extended assistance to an additional 19 counties. The additional 19 counties are contiguous to the 36 designated counties. The FSA will also allow livestock producers in 22 counties to graze CRP land after obtaining approval. High populations of spider mites required several soybean and some corn fields to be sprayed. Some operations have begun selling cattle because of the lack of forage. Corn silage is being chopped to help relieve short forage supplies. There were 6.8 days suitable for field work during the week. Seventy-nine percent of the corn acreage has silked compared with 23 percent last year and 39 percent for the 5-year average. Seven percent of the corn is in dough compared to 0 percent last year and 1 percent for the 5-year average. Corn condition continued to decline and is now rated 8 percent good to excellent compared with 53 percent last year at this time. Sixty-four percent of the soybean acreage is blooming compared with 26 percent last year and 36 percent for the 5-year average. Twelve percent of the soybean acreage is setting pods compared with 0 last year and 5 percent for the 5-year average. Soybean condition also fell further and is now rated 11 percent good to excellent compared with 53 percent last year at this time.

Minnesota: The warm weather stretch continued this week, and below average precipitation was received, according to the USDA, NASS, Minnesota Field Office. The southwestern part of the state remained dry, while some central areas of the state received over an inch of rain. As of July 15, topsoil moisture supplies were rated 47 percent adequate to surplus, down from 60 percent the previous week. Condition ratings for both corn and soybeans remained primarily good, however, reporters noted the lack of significant rainfall stressed some fields. Corn condition was rated 2 percent very poor, 7 percent poor, 24 percent fair, 56 percent good, and 11 percent excellent. Soybean condition was rated 1 percent very poor, 8 percent poor, 26 percent fair, 57 percent good, and 8 percent excellent. Statewide, 6.5 days were rated suitable for fieldwork during the week. Seventy-seven percent of the corn crop was silking and beyond, compared to 8 percent last year and 23 percent for the five year average. Corn was 5 percent in the milk stage. Soybeans were 80 percent blooming, compared to 28 percent last year and 40 percent average. Soybeans were 17 percent setting pods, compared to 1 percent last year and 4 percent average.

South Dakota: Conditions continued to decline, as the area endured another week of high temperatures and minimal moisture. Dry conditions allowed for 6.9 days suitable for field work. Major activities last week included harvesting of small grains, hauling water for livestock, caring for livestock, and cutting hay. Little change in drought conditions occurred across the state, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Warm and very dry conditions continued to dominate throughout most of the week statewide. All locations in the state were included in some form on the US Drought Monitor map. The worst locations were in D2 (Severe Drought) in the south central and far west. Average temperatures were in the 70’s to low 80’s. These temperatures ranged from near to slightly above average across most of the southern part of the state to over 5° F above average across the north. Daily temperatures once again reached triple digits in much of the west. Highs in the northeast reached around 90° F for a high. Milesville had the high for the week at 107° F. Custer had the low at 50° F. These temperatures continue to plague already dry locations across much of the state increasing stress on already stressed crops, pastures, and rangeland. Precipitation for the week was very light or non-existent across nearly the whole state. Most locations received very light totals. A few isolated stations (not in this report) received more than an inch of precipitation. All stations reported here received much less than an inch. Webster received the highest total at 0.65 inches. Fourteen locations received no precipitation. Many locations statewide (most in the southeast) over the last 30 days are in the top ten driest all time. Topsoil moisture dwindled from last week’s 27 percent adequate to surplus to 11 percent in adequate, 38 percent short and 51 percent very short. Subsoil moisture was rated at 15 percent adequate, 46 percent short and 39 percent very short. Sixty percent of corn had tasseled, with 36 percent in the silked and 3 percent in the dough stage. Soybeans were at 74 percent blooming with 12 percent setting pods ahead of the five year average of 3 percent setting pods.


 

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