State Crop Summaries: Corn Harvest Advances

September 11, 2012 01:00 AM
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

Iowa: Corn harvest continued this week with many farmers concentrating on fields with weaker stalks and those damaged by wind. A few producers have also started harvesting soybeans, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Iowa Field Office. There are reports of some farmers being able to get a fourth and even fifth cutting of alfalfa hay. There were 6.1 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the past week. Topsoil moisture level is rated at 48 percent very short, 36 percent short, 16 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture improved slightly and is now rated at 63 percent very short, 30 percent short, 7 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Ninety-seven percent of the corn crop has reached the dent stage, ahead of last year’s 91 percent and the five year average of 79 percent. Seventy-two percent of the corn crop is now mature, well ahead of last year’s 28 percent and the five year average of 25 percent. Ten percent of the corn crop has been harvested for grain or seed, three weeks ahead of normal. Moisture content of all corn in the field is estimated at 26 percent while the moisture content of corn being harvested is estimated at 21 percent. Corn lodging is rated at 57 percent none, 25 percent light, 13 percent moderate, and 5 percent heavy. Ear droppage is rated at 71 percent none, 21 percent light, 7 percent moderate, and 1 percent heavy. Corn condition improved slightly and is now rated at 22 percent very poor, 30 percent poor, 32 percent fair, 15 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Seventy-seven percent of the soybean crop is turning color, a jump of 26 percentage points from last week. Twenty-six percent of Iowa’s soybean fields are dropping leaves, 5 days ahead of last year. Soybean condition is reported at 13 percent very poor, 24 percent poor, 39 percent fair, 23 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Illinois: Most of the state received more rain again last week. Statewide precipitation averaged 1.32 inches, 0.69 inches above normal. Along with the rain came cooler temperatures with statewide temperatures averaging 72.6 degrees, 2.3 degrees above normal. Topsoil moisture was rated at 16 percent very short, 31 percent short, 52 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture levels improved slightly to 36 percent very short, 47 percent short, and 17 percent adequate. Corn harvest continued to progress with 21 percent of the crop now being harvested. Corn harvest was 4 percent complete at this time last year and the 5-year average for this time period is 6 percent. There was little change in the corn condition, now rated at 41 percent very poor, 34 percent poor, 20 percent fair, and 5 percent good. Soybean harvest is beginning in many areas around the state but only 1 percent of the crop has been harvested so far. Sixty percent of the soybean crop is turning yellow, compared to 40 percent last year and the 5-year average of 42 percent. Soybeans dropping leaves jumped to 21 percent, compared to 10 percent last year and the 5-year average of 16 percent. Soybean conditions were rated at 20 percent very poor, 22 percent poor, 39 percent fair, 18 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Nebraska: For the week ending September 9, 2012, another week with little to no rain, temperatures in triple digits, and winds led to even drier conditions, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Producers are encouraged to stay on alert as fires during harvest have been reported. Dryland corn harvest continues to spread across the state while harvest of early planted irrigated fields has begun in some locations. Seed corn harvest is in full swing and high moisture corn was picked for feed lots. Soybean fields are turning color and maturing rapidly. Winter wheat fields that have been seeded into dry topsoil will need moisture for emergence. Harvest of proso millet continued. Cattle producers continue supplemental feeding livestock due to reduced forage supplies. Selling of cattle remains active due to high feed prices. Little to no precipitation fell during the week. Temperatures averaged 1-2 degrees above normal across the state. Highs reached triple digits and overnight lows fell to the mid 30’s.

Corn in the dent stage reached 98 percent, ahead of 85 last year and 83 average. Corn mature reached 55 percent, compared to 7 last year and 17 days ahead of 13 average. Corn harvested for grain was 12 percent, compared to 1 last year and average. Corn conditions rated 22 percent very poor, 21 poor, 26 fair, 27 good, and 4 excellent, well below 76 percent good to excellent last year and 79 average. Irrigated corn conditions rated 51 percent good to excellent and dryland corn rated 3. Soybeans turning color were at 77 percent, compared to 31 last year and 11 days ahead of 44 average. Soybeans dropping leaves were 25 percent, compared to 2 last year and 7 average. Conditions rated 20 percent very poor, 27 poor, 35 fair, 17 good, and 1 excellent, well below last year’s 81 percent good to excellent and 77 average.

Missouri: With the northern border of the state remaining dry, the rest of the state enjoyed scattered showers. The precipitation helped pastures but limited producers to 4.8 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supply was 30 percent very short, 37 percent short, 33 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture supply improved to 63 percent very short, 29 percent short, 8 percent adequate. Corn mature was 91 percent, 13 days ahead of last year, and 26 days ahead of normal (5-year average). Corn harvested at 53 percent, was 18 days ahead of last year, and 25 days ahead of normal. Corn moisture at harvest was 15.9 percent, ranging from 13.1 percent in the west-central district to 17.6 percent in the north-central district. Corn condition was 58 percent very poor, 26 percent poor, 11 percent fair, 4 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Soybeans turning color was 42 percent, 5 days ahead of last year, and 1 week ahead of normal. Soybeans dropping leaves and beyond was 14 percent, 5 days ahead of last year, and 6 days ahead of normal. Soybeans mature was 2 percent, 4 days ahead of last year, and 3 days ahead of normal. Soybean harvest began. Soybean condition was 41 percent very poor, 33 percent poor, 19 percent fair, 6 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Ohio: The average temperature for the State was 73.3 degrees, 5.2 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, September 9, 2012. Precipitation averaged 1.95 inches, 1.31 inches above normal. There were 154 modified growing degree days, 26 days above normal. Reporters rated 5.2 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, September 7, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 27 percent very short, 39 percent short, 33 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Rain showers and cooler temperatures at the end of the week helped improve crop conditions. Field activities for the week included spraying for weeds and spider mites, tilling wheat stubble, applying fertilizer, seeding cover crops, and installing drainage tile. As of Sunday September 9th, corn dented was rated at 88 percent, compared to 51 percent last year and 69 percent for the five-year average. Twenty-six percent of corn was mature, 21 percent ahead of last year and 12 percent ahead of the five-year average. Two percent of the corn was harvested for grain. Corn for silage was 69 percent harvested, compared to 19 percent last year and 39 percent for the five-year average. Thirty-six percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, compared to seven percent last year and 24 percent for the five-year average. Seven percent of the soybeans were mature, three percent ahead of the five-year average. Soybeans were one percent harvested.

Indiana: Harvest progress was slowed during the week due to rain showers across most of the state, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Topsoil moisture has been recharged in many areas, but the subsoil remains mostly dry as field tiles are still not running. There have been some reports of aflatoxin and other molds in the corn crop. Soybean fields have been rapidly changing color and shedding leaves. Final cuttings of hay have been slow to cure due to frequent rains and heavy dew. Pasture condition continues to improve as grasses respond to the recent rains. There were 4.6 days suitable for field work during the week. Ninety-one percent of the corn acreage is in the dent stage compared to 68 percent last year and 73 percent for the 5-year average. Forty-seven percent of the corn acreage is mature compared to 19 percent last year and 27 percent for the 5-year average. Nine percent of the corn acreage has been harvested compared to 1 percent last year and 3 percent for the 5-year average. Corn condition is rated 9 percent good to excellent compared with 34 percent last year at this time. Forty-one percent of the soybean acreage is shedding leaves compared to 18 percent last year and 28 percent for the 5-year average. One percent of the soybean acreage has been harvested which was unchanged from last week. This compares to 0 percent last year and 1 percent for the 5-year average. Soybean condition is now rated 24 percent good to excellent compared with 41 percent last year at this time.

Minnesota: Harvest was underway for corn and soybeans this past week, according to the USDA, NASS, Minnesota Field Office. As of September 9, corn was 2 percent harvested, compared to 0 percent for the five year average. Corn harvested for silage advanced to 88 percent complete, compared to 36 percent average. Soybeans were 2 percent harvested, compared to 0 percent average. Other harvest progress included potatoes at 37 percent, sweet corn at 88 percent, dry beans at 49 percent, and sugarbeets at 10 percent complete, all ahead of their respective averages. Canola harvest was nearly complete at 99 percent harvested. Temperatures during the week averaged 2.4° above normal statewide and precipitation totals were primarily below average. Most of the state received some precipitation during the week, while two locations in southern parts of the state recorded over an inch. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 27 percent very short, 42 percent short, and 31 percent adequate. Statewide, 6.5 days were rated suitable for fieldwork during the week. Crop development continued ahead of average. Ninety-six percent of corn was in the dent stage or beyond, compared to 75 percent average, and 43 percent of corn was mature, compared to 13 percent average. Corn condition ratings were relatively unchanged from the previous week. Eighty-five percent of soybeans were turning yellow or beyond, compared to 55 percent average, and 51 percent of soybeans were dropping leaves or beyond, compared to 19 percent average. Eighteen percent of the state’s soybeans were mature, compared to 2 percent average. Soybean condition ratings were relatively unchanged from the previous week.

South Dakota: The dry weather forced row crops to rapidly advance into the mature stage, triggering the start of an early harvest. There were 6.8 days suitable for field work this past week. Major activities last week included beginning of row crop harvest, haying CRP acres, hauling water for livestock, early moving of cattle to stubble fields, caring for livestock. This report was based on information from regional extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the state. Cooler conditions over the weekend balanced out warmer than average conditions early in the week over large parts of the state, leading to close to average temperatures statewide, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Precipitation was again very limited. One storm event did bring heavier precipitation to east central South Dakota. The first patchy frost occurred over the week in north central to northeast parts of the state. Temperatures overall were within a couple degrees of average except for the southeast, which was 3-5° F above average. A few stations did reach 100° F again. Academy, Onida, Pierre and Winner all reached 100° F for the weekly high. Many stations did fall into the 30’s during the week. Faulkton and Kennebec had the lowest temperature at 34° F. Dry air is allowing larger temperature swings between highs and lows across the state. Isolated areas had decent precipitation during the week. Wessington Springs and Mitchell both recorded over an inch with Wessington Springs the highest total at 1.35 inches. Thirty stations received less than 0.10 inches. The lowest totals were at twenty of the stations which received no precipitation during the week. The US Drought Monitor increased the area covered by drought in the state as well as the drought levels. Most of the southern half of the state is in D3 (Extreme Drought) with an area of D4 (Exceptional Drought) in the southeast. The increase was due to continuing dry conditions and lack of precipitation which has led to the very poor grass conditions and crop losses. Topsoil moisture was rated at 8 percent adequate, 29 percent short and 63 percent very short; compared to 67 percent very short the previous week. Subsoil moisture was rated at 7 percent adequate, 31 percent short and 62 percent very short.

Row crop harvest has begun for some areas of the state with corn harvested at 7 percent. Corn conditions remained steady from the previous week at 23 percent very poor, 28 percent poor, 28 percent fair and 21 percent good to excellent. Corn in the mature stage was at 45 percent this week. Eighty-nine percent of the corn silage has been cut, well ahead of the previous year and five year averages of 35 and 29 percent, respectively. Soybean conditions also remained fairly steady with 15 percent very poor, 30 percent poor, 30 percent fair and 25 percent good to excellent. Soybeans dropping leaves was at 77 percent. Thirty-four percent of soybeans were rated mature compared to only 5 percent the previous week. Soybeans harvested were at 3 percent. Sorghum, with 99 percent turning color, had 42 percent mature compared to 12 percent mature the previous week.


 

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