State Crop Summaries: Farmers Hoping Rains Will Help With Pod Fill

August 28, 2012 12:38 AM
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

Iowa: Iowa experienced widespread rainfall late last week with the heaviest precipitation in the southwest and south central parts of the state. Although soybean conditions lag behind previous years, farmers are hoping plants will produce more pods as a result of recent rains. In addition to farmers chopping their corn for silage, there are reports of farmers starting to harvest corn for grain or seed according to the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistical Service, Iowa Field Office. There were 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the past week. Topsoil moisture levels improved to 49 percent very short, 30 percent short, 19 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture also improved and is now rated at 64 percent very short, 30 percent short, 6 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Ninety-six percent of the corn crop has reached dough stage, ahead of last year’s 88 percent and the five year average of 77 percent. Eighty-two percent of the corn crop has reached the dent stage, ahead of last year’s 62 percent and the five year average of 45 percent. Twenty-seven percent of the corn crop is now mature, two weeks ahead of normal. Corn condition is reported at 23 percent very poor, 30 percent poor, 32 percent fair, 14 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Pods are being set on 98 percent of the soybean crop. Nineteen percent of soybean crop is turning color, ahead of last year’s three percent and the five year average of six percent. Reports of soybean leaves dropping came in from across the state. Soybean condition is reported at 14 percent very poor, 22 percent poor, 39 percent fair, 23 percent good, and 2 percent excellent. Harvest of third cutting of alfalfa hay, at 95 percent complete, is a month ahead of normal. Nineteen percent of Iowa’s pasture and range land is rated in fair or better condition, a three percentage point increase from last week. Pasture and range condition rated 55 percent very poor, 26 percent poor, 15 percent fair, 4 percent good, and 0 percent excellent. Cattle on feed recorded good gains thanks to optimal weather conditions.

Illinois: Western districts enjoyed some precipitation, but the rest of the state remained dry. There were 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork allowing harvest of nearly half a million corn acres. Topsoil moisture improved to 85 percent very short, 11 percent short, and 4 percent adequate but remaining significantly below the 5-year average of 15 percent very short, 27 percent short, 53 percent adequate, and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was 88 percent very short, 11 percent short, and 1 percent adequate.Corn dented was 93 percent, 8 days ahead of last year, and 3 weeks ahead of normal (5-year average). Corn mature was 67 percent, 15 days ahead of 2011 and 23 days ahead of normal. Corn harvested now at 32 percent, was 22 days ahead of last year, and 27 days ahead of normal. Corn moisture at harvest was 16.8 percent ranging from 18.9 percent in the north-central to 13.2 percent in the west-central district. Corn condition declined to 58 percent very poor, 27 percent poor, 11 percent fair, 3 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Soybeans setting pods and beyond were 85 percent, 3 days ahead of last year, and 6 days ahead of normal. Soybeans turning color and beyond were 13 percent, 9 days ahead of last year, and 8 days ahead of normal. Soybeans dropping leaves and beyond were 3 percent, 9 days ahead of last year, and 6 days ahead of normal. Soybean condition declined to 46 percent very poor, 32 percent poor, 15 percent fair, 6 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Nebraska: For the week ending August 26, 2012, cooler temperatures near the end of the week coupled with precipitation across the southeastern third of the State were welcome. However, northern and western counties remained dry, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Dryland corn harvest picked up momentum across the Southeast and portions of East Central Nebraska. Drought damaged corn fields continue to be chopped for silage where moisture is still high enough. Irrigation was in the last stages in most areas of the State. Cattle producers are waiting for access to stalk fields as many are supplemental feeding livestock. Culling and marketing of livestock continues due to lack of forage. Rain fell late in the week across Southeast and East Central Nebraska with amounts over 1 inch recorded. Remaining areas received little to no precipitation. Temperatures averaged 2 degrees above normal across Panhandle and North Central counties and near normal elsewhere. Highs were generally in the mid-90’s and lows in the mid-40’s.

Corn in the dent stage reached 82 percent, ahead of 45 last year and 52 average. Corn mature reached 22 percent, compared to 1 last year and average. Corn harvested for grain was 4 percent, compared to 0 last year and average. Corn conditions rated 22 percent very poor, 19 poor, 28 fair, 29 good, and 2 excellent, well below 77 percent good to excellent last year and average. Irrigated corn conditions rated 52 percent good to excellent and dryland corn rated 3. Soybeans setting pods were 96 percent, near 93 last year and 95 average. Soybeans turning color were at 22 percent, compared to 1 last year and 4 average. Soybeans dropping leaves were 3 percent, compared to 0 last year and average. Conditions rated 18 percent very poor, 24 poor, 37 fair, 20 good, and 1 excellent, well below last year’s 81 percent good to excellent and 77 average.

Missouri: Western districts enjoyed some precipitation, but the rest of the state remained dry. There were 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork allowing harvest of nearly half a million corn acres. Topsoil moisture improved to 85 percent very short, 11 percent short, and 4 percent adequate but remaining significantly below the 5-year average of 15 percent very short, 27 percent short, 53 percent adequate, and 5 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was 88 percent very short, 11 percent short, and 1 percent adequate. Corn dented was 93 percent, 8 days ahead of last year, and 3 weeks ahead of normal (5-year average). Corn mature was 67 percent, 15 days ahead of 2011 and 23 days ahead of normal. Corn harvested now at 32 percent, was 22 days ahead of last year, and 27 days ahead of normal. Corn moisture at harvest was 16.8 percent ranging from 18.9 percent in the north-central to 13.2 percent in the west-central district. Corn condition declined to 58 percent very poor, 27 percent poor, 11 percent fair, 3 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Soybeans setting pods and beyond were 85 percent, 3 days ahead of last year, and 6 days ahead of normal. Soybeans turning color and beyond were 13 percent, 9 days ahead of last year, and 8 days ahead of normal. Soybeans dropping leaves and beyond were 3 percent, 9 days ahead of last year, and 6 days ahead of normal. Soybean condition declined to 46 percent very poor, 32 percent poor, 15 percent fair, 6 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Ohio: The average temperature for the State was 70.6 degrees, 0.2 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, August 26, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.17 inches, 0.61 inches below normal. There were 141 modified growing degree days, 1 day below normal. Reporters rated 6.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, August 24, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 41 percent very short, 37 percent short, 22 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. There were isolated showers and enough precipitation to reach what is average for this time of year, but it did little to improve already draught-stricken crops. Field activities for the week included spraying for weeds and spider mites, tilling wheat stubble, applying fertilizer, and installing tile drainage. As of Sunday August 26th, 92 percent of corn was rated in the dough development stage, compared to 67 percent last year and 79 percent for the five-year average. Corn dented was rated at 59 percent, compared to 18 percent last year and 36 percent for the five-year average. Six percent of corn was mature, five percent ahead of last year and four percent ahead of the five-year average. Corn for silage was 39 percent harvested, compared to six percent last year and ten percent for the five-year average. Fifteen percent of soybeans were dropping leaves, compared to one percent last year and three percent for the five-year average.

Indiana: Corn harvest has begun with widely varying yields being reported, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Most of the corn harvest that has taken place thus far has been across the west central and southern districts. Harvest of seed corn, tobacco, potatoes and processing tomatoes is also underway. Several soybean fields around the state are turning yellow and beginning to shed leaves. There were a few reports of Bean Leaf Beetles and Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) in soybeans during the week. There were 6.3 days suitable for field work during the week. Ninety-six percent of the corn acreage is in dough compared with 81 percent last year and 83 percent for the 5-year average. Seventy-three percent of the corn is in the dent stage compared to 36 percent last year and 42 percent for the 5-year average. Seventeen percent of the corn acreage is mature compared to 2 percent last year and 5 percent for the 5-year average. Two percent of the corn acreage has been harvested compared to 0 percent for both last year and the 5-year average. Corn condition is rated 10 percent good to excellent compared with 37 percent last year at this time. Ninety-seven percent of the soybean acreage is setting pods compared with 84 percent last year and 88 percent for the 5-year average. Eleven percent of the soybeans are shedding leaves compared to 1 percent last year and 4 percent for the 5-year average. Soybean condition continued to improve and is now rated 23 percent good to excellent compared with 45 percent last year at this time.

Minnesota: As of August 26, 26 percent of soybeans were turning yellow or beyond, according to the USDA, NASS, Minnesota Field Office. The percentage of soybeans turning yellow was 18 percentage points ahead of the five year average. Four percent of soybeans were dropping leaves or beyond, compared to 1 percent average. Soybeans were rated 80 percent in fair to good condition, compared to 81 percent the previous week. Seventy-five percent of corn was in the dent stage or beyond, compared to 50 percent last week, and 35 percent average. Two percent of corn was mature, compared to 1 percent average. Corn condition was rated 76 percent fair to good, compared to 77 percent the previous week. Corn harvested for silage was 34 percent complete.

South Dakota: The majority of the crops saw a decline in condition ratings this past week, as temperatures climbed. There were 6.8 days suitable for field work this past week. Major activities last week included haying CRP acres, hauling water for livestock, caring for livestock and preparing for a possible early harvest of row crops for grain. This report was based on information from regional extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the state. Warm temperatures returned to the state during the week with temperatures reaching into the 90’s and low 100’s in a few places, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Along with the warm temperatures little precipitation fell anywhere in the state. The combination of conditions did not improve drought conditions anywhere in the state. Soil moisture recovery needed for fall seeding consideration and overall recharge was also obviously limited. Temperatures for the week averaged in the upper 60’s to low 70’s statewide. Not only warmer than the previous week, they were also warmer than average nearly statewide. Most locations were 1-3° F above average except for a couple eastern stations, which were below average. The highest daily temperature was 103o F at Winner. All other stations reached the 90’s for highs. The lowest reported temperature was 42o F at Custer and Buffalo. Precipitation was minimal for the week with only 18 stations reporting precipitation. Faulkton had the highest total at 0.44 inches. Over half the stations reported no precipitation. No station was above average for weekly precipitation. Growing season total precipitation deficits exceed seven inches over most of the southeast stations. Other stations statewide are below average, though only showing deficits of 3-5 inches in many locations. Topsoil moisture was rated at 64 percent very short, 27 percent short and 9 percent adequate; a decrease from the previous week’s estimate of 19 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture was rated at 68 percent very short, 22 percent short and 10 percent adequate. Ninety-three percent of the corn crop was in the dough stage with 66 percent dented, both well ahead of the five year averages of 74 percent for the dough stage and 27 percent dented. Corn in the mature stage was at 7 percent, ahead of the five year average of 1 percent. Sixty-nine percent of the corn silage has been cut, well ahead of the previous year and five year averages of 5 and 4 percent, respectively. Soybeans setting pods has reached 100 percent with 26 percent dropping leaves.


 

Back to news


Comments

 
Spell Check

No comments have been posted to this News Article

Corn College TV Education Series

2014_Team_Shot_with_Logo

Get nearly 8 hours of educational video with Farm Journal's top agronomists. Produced in the field and neatly organized by topic, from spring prep to post-harvest. Order now!

Markets

Market Data provided by QTInfo.com
Brought to you by Beyer
Close