State Crop Summaries: Milder Temps Limit Stress on Crops

August 14, 2012 01:00 AM
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

Iowa: Iowa saw a mix of cooler temperatures and widespread rainfall during the week. Rainfall amounts varied widely with the heaviest precipitation in North East and Southwest Iowa. The week’s activities included spraying crops, harvesting oats, cutting hay, and chopping corn. There were 6.1 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the past week. Topsoil moisture levels improved to 60 percent very short, 31 percent short, 9 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture is rated at 70 percent very short, 26 percent short, 4 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Ninety-four percent of the corn crop has reached the milk stage, ahead of last year’s 81 percent and the five year average of 73 percent. Eighty percent of the corn crop has reached dough stage, well ahead of last year’s 43 percent and the five year average of 37 percent. Forty-five percent of the corn crop has reached the dent stage, almost two weeks ahead of normal. Seven percent of the corn crop is now mature, almost three weeks ahead of normal. Corn condition declined slightly and now is reported at 22 percent very poor, 29 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 15 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Pods are being set on 88 percent of the soybean crop. Soybean condition improved for the first time in seven weeks and now is rated 14 percent very poor, 23 percent poor, 38 percent fair, 24 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Illinois: Temperatures moderated somewhat compared to previous weeks while the rainfall total once again fell below average. Statewide temperatures averaged 72.8 degrees, 0.9 degrees below normal. Precipitation totaled 0.28 inches, 0.63 inches below normal. Topsoil moisture was unchanged from last week with 72 percent very short, 23 percent short and 5 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture was rated 80 percent very short, 17 percent short and 3 percent adequate. Producers were busy with activities including continued spraying for spider mites and silage chopping in some locations across the state. Some producers are harvesting corn already while others are finishing up final preparations to begin harvest. Limestone piles were spotted in some fields around the state. Corn in the dent stage has reached 62 percent statewide, compared to 24 percent last year and the 5-year average of 23 percent. Corn conditions were rated at 42 percent very poor, 33 percent poor, 20 percent fair and 5 percent good. Soybeans setting pods has reached 88 percent, compared to 70 percent last year and the 5-year average of 70 percent. Soybean conditions improved slightly to 28 percent very poor, 27 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 11 percent good and 1 percent excellent.

Nebraska: For the week ending August 12, 2012, temperatures moderated; however, with only limited precipitation, crop conditions continued to decline, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Drought damaged corn fields continue to be chopped for silage or baled for hay. A few fields of corn were harvested for grain in some southeastern counties, but progress is limited and not widespread. Irrigation remains active as crop progress advances. Fields are being prepared for seeding of winter wheat in the West. Cattle are being removed from pastures and receiving supplemental feed. Light rain fell in all districts with amounts averaging less than one third of an inch. A few isolated pockets in the Central and East Central Districts received over one inch of rainfall. Temperatures were 1 degree above normal in the Northwest and Southwest Districts while averaging 2 degrees below normal for the rest of the state. Highs reached triple digits in many areas and lows were mostly in the low 50’s.

For the week ending August 12, 2012, temperatures moderated; however, with only limited precipitation, crop conditions continued to decline, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Drought damaged corn fields continue to be chopped for silage or baled for hay. A few fields of corn were harvested for grain in some southeastern counties, but progress is limited and not widespread. Irrigation remains active as crop progress advances. Fields are being prepared for seeding of winter wheat in the West. Cattle are being removed from pastures and receiving supplemental feed. Weather Summary: Light rain fell in all districts with amounts averaging less than one third of an inch. A few isolated pockets in the Central and East Central Districts received over one inch of rainfall. Temperatures were 1 degree above normal in the Northwest and Southwest Districts while averaging 2 degrees below normal for the rest of the state. Highs reached triple digits in many areas and lows were mostly in the low 50’s

Missouri: Cooler temperatures offered a reprieve from the oppressive heat, but conditions remained dry. There were 6.8 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supply was 89 percent very short, 10 percent short, and 1 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture supply was 88 percent very short, 11 percent short, and 1 percent adequate. The 1 percent adequate for topsoil and subsoil was due to irrigation in the southeast district. Corn dough stage and beyond was 94 percent, 2 weeks ahead of last year, and 3 weeks ahead of normal; southern districts were complete. Corn dented was 75 percent, 12 days ahead of last year, and 19 days ahead of normal. Corn mature was 35 percent, 17 days ahead of last year, and 3 weeks ahead of normal. Corn harvested for grain was 10 percent, 21 days ahead of last year, and 23 days ahead of normal. Corn condition, similar to last week, was 57 percent very poor, 27 percent poor, 12 percent fair, 3 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. High winds damaged some corn in the central district. Soybeans blooming and beyond were 92 percent, 1 week ahead of last year, and 12 days ahead of normal. Soybeans setting pods and beyond was 61 percent, 4 days ahead of last year, and 1 week ahead of normal. Soybeans began to turn color. Soybean condition was 39 percent very poor, 36 percent poor, 19 percent fair, 5 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Ohio: The average temperature for the State was 71.7 degrees, 0.2 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, August 12, 2012. Precipitation averaged 1.40 inches, 0.52 inches above normal. There were 132 modified growing degree days, 17 days below normal. Reporters rated 5.5 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, August 10, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 37 percent very short, 34 percent short, 28 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. This week’s multiple rain storms and cooler temperatures reduced stress on crops and livestock. Field activities for the week included the beginning of corn silage and processing tomato harvest. The fruit, vegetable, and potato harvest continues. Observations of spider mites have been reported in west central region soybean fields. Also, western corn root beetles have been identified in traps; however the incidence rate was low. As of Sunday August 12th, 67 percent of corn was rated in the dough development stage, compared to 26 percent last year and 50 percent for the five-year average. Corn dented was rated at 22 percent, 20 percent ahead of last year and 14 percent ahead of the five-year average. Corn for silage was 9 percent harvested, eight percent ahead of last year. The soybean crop was 89 percent setting pods, compared to 39 percent last year and 72 percent for the five-year average.

Indiana: Welcomed rain showers and cooler temperatures during the week brought some relief to both crops and livestock, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Hail caused some crop damage in a few localized areas especially in the northern districts. Soybeans, hay crops and pastures are expected to benefit the most from the recent precipitation, and it should also help with grain weight in some of the latest planted corn. Spider mites continued to be a problem which required additional soybean fields to be sprayed. More drought damaged corn was chopped for silage as it will provide more nutritional value for cattle than it would if it were harvested for grain. Farmers also began cleaning grain bins and preparing equipment for the upcoming harvest. There were 5.6 days suitable for field work during the week. Eighty-three percent of the corn acreage is in dough compared with 41 percent last year and 50 percent for the 5-year average. Thirty-nine percent of the corn is in the dent stage compared to 4 percent last year and 12 percent for the 5-year average. Corn condition improved slightly and is now rated 9 percent good to excellent compared with 39 percent last year at this time. Ninety-seven percent of the soybean acreage is blooming compared with 87 percent last year and 90 percent for the 5-year average. Eighty percent of the soybean acreage is setting pods compared with 53 percent last year and 61 percent for the 5-year average. Soybean condition also improved slightly and is now rated 16 percent good to excellent compared with 47 percent last year at this time.

Minnesota: The small grain harvest neared completion despite scattered precipitation during the week, according to the USDA, NASS, Minnesota Field Office. Other harvest progress included sweet corn at 49 percent complete, canola at 23 percent complete, potatoes at 11 percent complete, and corn harvested for silage at 8 percent complete. Cooler, dry conditions prevailed during the week. Statewide, average temperatures were 3° cooler than normal. Topsoil moisture supplies were relatively unchanged from the previous week and were rated 15 percent very short, 35 percent short, 49 percent adequate, and 1 percent surplus. Statewide, 5.9 days were rated suitable for fieldwork. Corn was 95 percent at the milk stage or beyond, compared to 65 percent for the five year average. Corn was 74 percent at the dough stage or beyond, compared to 26 percent average. Twenty-three percent of corn was at the dent stage, compared to 5 percent average. Soybeans were 94 percent setting pods, compared to 74 percent average, and 2 percent turning yellow, compared to 1 percent average. The corn crop was rated 77 percent in fair to good condition, while soybeans were rated 80 percent in fair to good condition. Both corn and soybean condition ratings held relatively steady from the previous week.

South Dakota: Weather conditions improved slightly with precipitation and cooler temperatures seen across most of the state. There were 6.2 days suitable for field work this past week. For the first time since early June, temperatures were below average over much of the state, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Precipitation was fairly wide spread but generally light again. Temperatures averaged in the upper 60’s to lower 70’s statewide. These were below average by 1-5° F over most of the eastern part of the state. A few stations in the southwest were slightly above average. Several stations in the south central still reached triple digits. The high temperature of the week was at Pickstown with 104° F; the low temperature was at Custer with 41° F. Precipitation was similar to the previous week with a few locations receiving over an inch helping drought conditions in those locations. Overall totals were mostly under half an inch across the state. Roscoe and Spearfish received over an inch of precipitation. Spearfish received the most at 1.09 inches. Kennebec had the least precipitation with no recorded precipitation. Topsoil moisture was rated at 13 percent adequate, 36 percent short and 51 percent very short. Subsoil moisture was rated at 12 percent adequate to surplus, 35 percent short and 53 percent very short. Seventy-seven percent of corn has reached the dough stage, compared to 22 percent last year at this time and 27 percent for the five year average. Corn in the dent stage was at 22 percent well ahead of the five year average of 4 percent. Soybeans had 97 percent blooming with 85 percent setting pods and 3 percent dropping leaves.


 

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