State Crop Summaries: Rains Stabilize Crops in Many Areas

August 7, 2012 12:57 AM
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

Iowa: Iowa farmers welcomed widespread rainfall for the second straight week with the heaviest precipitation in East Central and South Central Iowa. Both corn and soybean conditions declined slightly for the week. The week’s activities included spraying crops and chopping corn. There were 6.4 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the past week. Topsoil moisture levels improved slightly to 66 percent very short, 27 percent short, 7 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Subsoil moisture is rated at 71 percent very short, 25 percent short, 4 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Eighty-five percent of the corn crop has reached the milk stage, ahead of last year’s 58 percent and the five year average of 52 percent. Sixty-five percent of the corn crop has reached dough stage, two weeks ahead of normal. Twenty-seven percent of the corn crop has reached the dent stage, also two weeks ahead of normal. Corn condition is reported at 20 percent very poor, 29 percent poor, 35 percent fair, 15 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Pods are being set on 77 percent of the soybean crop, ahead of last year’s 64 percent and the five-year average of 68 percent. Soybean condition is rated 13 percent very poor, 24 percent poor, 39 percent fair, 23 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Illinois: Temperatures across the state remained above normal last week and for the first time in weeks, precipitation made its way above normal as well. Statewide temperatures averaged 80.6 degrees, 6.7 degrees above normal. Precipitation totaled 1.06 inches, 0.23 inches above normal. Topsoil moisture was rated at 72 percent very short, 23 percent short and 5 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture was rated 81 percent very short, 18 percent short and one percent adequate. The main activities for the week included spraying for spider mites, chopping silage, cutting hay on newly released CRP grounds, and harvesting corn in some areas. Across the state, one percent of the corn crop has been reported as being harvested. Corn doughed was at 81 percent, compared to 51 percent last year and the 5-year average of 50 percent. Corn dented was at 38 percent, compared to 8 percent last year and the 5-year average of 11 percent. Corn conditions were rated at 42 percent very poor, 32 percent poor, 22 percent fair and 4 percent good. Soybeans blooming were at 97 percent, compared to 90 percent last year and the 5-year average of 85 percent. Eighty-two percent of the soybean crop is now setting pods, compared to 54 percent last year and the 5-year average of 52 percent. Soybean conditions were rated at 28 percent very poor, 29 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 9 percent good and one percent excellent.

Nebraska: For the week ending August 5, 2012, precipitation and moderating temperatures brought some relief to crops and pastures along the southern third of the State, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. However, much of the eastern third of the state, where most of the dryland crops are grown, received only limited precipitation with conditions remaining poor for dryland crops and pastures. Drought damaged corn acres continue being chopped for silage or cut for hay to make up for pastures which are providing little or no grazing capacity. Irrigators continued their struggle with water demands and many livestock producers were hauling water due to dry ponds. Several rain events occurred during the week bringing precipitation to most regions of the state. The Southern two tiers of counties received the most rainfall with pockets averaging over two inches of rainfall, while the upper two-thirds of the state averaged only .50 inch. Temperatures were 2 degrees above normal for the week with highs reaching triple digits in some areas of the state. Lows were recorded in the mid 40’s in northern and central counties and 50’s elsewhere.

Corn in the dough stage was 76 percent, compared to 29 last year and 13 days ahead of 34 average. Corn in the dent stage reached 32 percent, ahead of 1 last year and 3 average. Corn that has reached maturity was 3 percent, compared to 0 last year and average. Corn conditions rated 17 percent very poor, 20 poor, 28 fair, 32 good, and 3 excellent, well below 78 percent good to excellent last year and average. Irrigated corn conditions rated 56 percent good to excellent and dryland corn rated 4. Soybeans blooming were 94 percent, ahead of 87 last year and 90 average. Soybeans setting pods were 61 percent, ahead of 46 last year and 54 average. Soybean conditions rated 14 percent very poor, 23 poor, 41 fair, 21 good, and 1 excellent, well below last year’s 77 percent good to excellent and 76 average.

Missouri: Although scattered rainfall continued, conditions remained hot and dry. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supply improved slightly to 87 percent very short, 11 percent short, and 2 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture supply also improved slightly to 87 percent very short, 12 percent short, and 1 percent adequate. Corn dough stage and beyond was 87 percent, 12 days ahead of last year, and 19 days ahead of normal (5-year average). Corn dented was 64 percent, 2 weeks ahead of last year, and 20 days ahead of normal. Corn mature was 23 percent, 19 days ahead of last year, and 3 weeks ahead of normal. Corn harvested was 6 percent, 23 days ahead of last year and 25 days ahead of normal. Corn condition was 56 percent very poor, 28 percent poor, 11 percent fair, 3 percent good, and 2 percent excellent. Soybeans blooming and beyond were 85 percent, 1 week ahead of last year, and 13 days ahead of normal. Soybeans setting pods and beyond were 42 percent, 4 days ahead of 2011, and 5 days ahead of normal. Soybean condition was 37 percent very poor, 37 percent poor, 20 percent fair, 5 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Ohio: The average temperature for the State was 76.8 degrees, 4.6 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, August 5, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.62 inches, 0.22 inches below normal. There were 178 modified growing degree days, 26 days above normal. Reporters rated 6.7 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, August 3, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 45 percent very short, 41 percent short, 14 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Persistently high temperatures and low precipitation continue to stress crops and livestock. Even in corn fields that appear normal, kernel count is low. Spider mites have been reported in soybean fields, and as a result, operators began spraying fields with insecticide. Herbicide application has also been necessary, as weed pressure is high. Hay conditions are extremely poor. As of Sunday August 5th, 98 percent of corn was silked (tasseled), compared to 76 percent last year and 89 percent for the five-year average. Corn in dough was rated at 53 percent, compared to 12 percent last year and 26 percent for the five-year average. Corn dented was rated at ten percent, nine percent ahead of last year, and eight percent ahead of the five-year average. The soybean crop was 97 percent blooming, compared to 74 percent last year and 88 percent for the five-year average. Sixty-eight percent of the soybean acreage was setting pods, compared to 20 percent last year and 50 percent for the five-year average.

Indiana: Sparse to significant rain across the state with some instances of severe weather, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. The precipitation is expected to benefit pastures and alfalfa fields but much more rain is needed. The rains also assisted farmers working to control spider mites. There were some reports of downed corn after storms moved through the state. Concerns over water supply rose as some wells ran dry along with creeks and small ponds. Ears have been dropping, but true progress has been difficult given extreme conditions and wide variability between fields. There were 6.3 days suitable for field work during the week. Sixty-nine percent of the corn acreage is in dough compared with 19 percent last year and 29 percent for the 5-year average. Twenty-five percent of the corn is in the dent stage compared to 0 percent last year and 4 percent for the 5-year average. Corn condition deteriorated slightly and is now rated 7 percent good to excellent compared with 41 percent last year at this time. Ninety-four percent of the soybean acreage is blooming compared with 76 percent last year and 81 percent for the 5-year average. Six percent of the soybean acreage is setting pods compared with 33 percent last year and 43 percent for the 5-year average. Soybean condition decreased slightly and is now rated 15 percent good to excellent compared with 44 percent last year at this time.

Minnesota: Welcomed precipitation was received across the state this past week, according to the USDA, NASS, Minnesota Field Office. For the week ending August 5, precipitation amounts averaged from 1.6 inches in south east areas to .71 inch in central areas. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 15 percent very short, 35 percent short, 48 percent adequate, and 2 percent surplus, holding relatively steady from the previous week. Statewide, 5.8 days were rated suitable for fieldwork. Producers made significant small grain harvest progress despite the rain. Corn was 84 percent at the milk stage or beyond, compared to 38 percent average. Corn was 40 percent at the dough stage or beyond, compared to 8 percent average. Five percent of corn was at the dent stage, compared to 0 percent average. Soybeans were 98 percent blooming, compared to 89 percent average and 83 percent setting pods, compared to 53 percent average. The corn crop was rated 76 percent in fair to good condition, while soybeans were rated 80 percent in fair to good condition. Both corn and soybean condition ratings were relatively unchanged from the previous week.

South Dakota: Dry conditions continued, but temperatures eased a little during the week allowing for 6.4 days suitable for field work. Overall drought conditions have stabilized across the state, according to the State Climate Office of South Dakota. Slightly cooler (though still above average) temperatures with some precipitation kept conditions from worsening. Amounts of precipitation were generally not significant enough to make major improvements. Damage to corn has been done. Recent precipitation may have helped soybeans in the heavier precipitation areas. Precipitation was more widespread than in many weeks with several locations (mostly East River) receiving larger precipitation totals. Overall totals were mostly under an inch across the state. Three stations reported more than an inch (Academy, Brookings and Clear Lake). Brookings had the highest total at 1.26 inches. Several statewide locations received lower totals. Thirteen stations received 0.10 inches or less. Faith had the lowest total for the week at 0.01 inches. Growing season totals are below average statewide with the most extreme being 5-6 inches below average or more since April 1. Mitchell and Madison are above average only due to very heavy May rainfalls. Temperatures for the week averaged in the low 70os F statewide. Northern stations were only a few degrees above average while most southern stations were 5-8o F above average. The highest temperature was 106o F at Academy, Philip, and Pickstown. The lowest reported was 42o F at Custer. Growing degree day totals statewide are well above average in all locations leading to faster maturity of crops. Topsoil moisture was rated at 15 percent adequate to surplus, 32 percent short and 53 percent very short. Subsoil moisture was rated at 16 percent adequate to surplus, 29 percent short and 55 percent very short.

Ninety-seven percent of the corn was in the silking stage with 39 percent in the dough stage. Soybeans had 92 percent blooming with 70 percent setting pods, ahead of the five year average of 46 percent setting pods.


 

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