State Crop Summaries Reflect Worsening Drought Stress

July 10, 2012 12:29 AM
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

Iowa: Triple digit temperatures and little if any rainfall in most areas of the State caused crop conditions to decline significantly during the week. Iowa farmers not only faced hot, dry conditions but insect populations are on the rise with many fields being treated. There were 6.9 days suitable for fieldwork statewide during the past week. Topsoil moisture levels declined to 48 percent very short, 40 percent short, 12 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Central and South Central Iowa are the driest with at least 96 percent of the topsoil moisture rated short to very short. Subsoil moisture dropped to 38 percent very short, 44 percent short, 18 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. Sixty-two percent of the corn crop is at or beyond the tasseling stage, well ahead of last year’s 3 percent and the five-year average of 16 percent. Forty-eight percent of the corn crop is silking, nearly two weeks ahead of normal. Corn condition is reported at 5 percent very poor, 13 percent poor, 36 percent fair, 40 percent good, and 6 percent excellent. The combined good to excellent percentage of 46 is at the lowest level for the first week of July since 1993. Fifty-two percent of the soybean crop is blooming, ahead of last year’s 29 percent and the five-year average of 34 percent. Soybean condition is rated 4 percent very poor, 11 percent poor, 37 percent fair, 42 percent good, and 6 percent excellent. Ninety-two percent of the oat crop has turned color, well ahead of last year’s 38 percent and the five-year average of 49 percent.

Illinois: The hot, dry weather persisted over much of the state again this week. Statewide temperatures averaged 86.4 degrees, 10.9 above normal. Precipitation totaled 0.22 inches across the state, 0.63 inches below normal. Topsoil moisture continued to be a major concern for the entire state and was rated at 67 percent very short, 29 percent short and only 4 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture was also a concern, rated 65 percent very short, 28 percent short and only 7 percent adequate. Corn silked has reached 77 percent, compared to 22 percent last year and the 5-year average of 33 percent. Corn doughed was at 8 percent, compared to 1 percent last year and the 5-year average of 2 percent. Corn conditions declined and were rated at 23 percent very poor, 25 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 17 percent good, and 2 percent excellent. Forty-two percent of the soybean crop is now blooming, compared to 14 percent last year and the 5-year average of 24 percent. Six percent of the soybean crop has begun setting pods, ahead of last year and the 5-year average. Soybean conditions were rated at 17 percent very poor, 25 percent poor, 38 percent fair, 18 percent good, and 2 percent excellent.

Nebraska: For the week ending July 8, 2012, crop conditions continued to decline with triple digit temperatures and limited precipitation, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Topsoil moisture levels declined to 14 percent adequate or surplus and have not been this low at this time since 2002. One half of the corn crop reached the pollination stage or beyond with the first fields reaching dough stage. Over one third of the soybean crop is blooming and setting pods has just begun. The southern tier of counties in the Panhandle and the Southwest District received measureable rainfall with some locations accumulating over two inches. The remainder of the state saw little to no precipitation. Temperatures ranged from 6 degrees above normal in the Eastern two-thirds of the state to 2 degrees above normal in the Panhandle. Highs reached triple digits in many locations and lows were recorded in the mid 60’s.

Corn silked was 50 percent, compared to 6 last year and 14 average. Corn in the dough stage was 1 percent, compared to 0 last year and average. Corn conditions declined and rated 7 percent very poor, 13 poor, 33 fair, 40 good, and 7 excellent, well below last year’s 84 percent good to excellent and 81 average. Irrigated corn conditions rated 65 percent good to excellent and dryland corn rated 22. Soybeans blooming were 37 percent, ahead of 16 last year and 23 average. Soybeans setting pods was 4 percent, ahead of 0 last year and 1 average. Soybean conditions rated 5 percent very poor, 14 poor, 40 fair, 38 good, and 3 excellent, well below last year’s 81 percent good to excellent and 79 average.

Missouri: Fire danger was elevated to extreme level due to prolonged above average temperatures coupled with little rainfall. Fires were sparked from machinery and fireworks. Extreme drought created a growing climate that can only be described as bleak. Although there were 6.7 days suitable for fieldwork, topsoil moisture declined to 78 percent very short, 19 percent short, and 3 percent adequate. Subsoil moisture was 70 percent very short, 26 percent short, and 4 percent adequate. Corn silked was 75 percent, 10 days ahead of last year, and 2 weeks ahead of normal (5-year average). Corn dough stage and beyond was 21 percent, 2 weeks ahead of last year and normal. Corn condition was 28 percent very poor, 32 percent poor, 28 percent fair, 11 percent good, and 1 percent excellent. Soybeans blooming and beyond were 30 percent, 8 days ahead of last year, and 10 days ahead of normal. Soybeans setting pods and beyond were 3 percent, 4 and 5 days ahead of last year and normal. Soybean condition was 23 percent very poor, 31 percent poor, 33 percent fair, 12 percent good, and 1 percent excellent.

Ohio: The average temperature for the State was 82.4 degrees, 10.0 degrees above normal for the week ending Sunday, July 8, 2012. Precipitation averaged 0.63 inches, 0.15 inches below normal. There were 174 modified growing degree days, 21 days above normal. Reporters rated 6.1 days suitable for fieldwork during the seven-day period ending Friday, July 6, 2012. Topsoil moisture was rated 49 percent very short, 39 percent short, 12 percent adequate, and 0 percent surplus. As of Sunday July 8th, 41 percent of corn was silked (tasseled), which was 40 percent ahead of last year and 29 percent ahead of the five-year average. The soybean crop was 36 percent blooming, compared to three percent last year and 22 percent for the five-year average.

Indiana: Scattered showers brought precipitation to some areas of the state, but the intense heat negated nearly all of the benefits, according to the Indiana Field Office of USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Drought conditions continued to worsen; temperatures exceeded 100 degrees several days during the week. A large portion of the corn crop moved into the pollination stage under these extreme conditions. Some farmers and crop insurance representatives are discussing the prospect of destroying or cutting corn for forage. An increasing number of soybean fields were sprayed for spider mites. Detasseling was underway in seed corn fields. Many double cropped soybean fields have had very poor emergence due to dry soil, while some farmers continue to wait for rain before planting. There were 6.7 days suitable for field work during the week. Sixty percent of the corn acreage has silked compared with 3 percent last year and 19 percent for the 5-year average. Corn condition continued to decline and is now rated 12 percent good to excellent compared with 59 percent last year at this time. Forty-four percent of the soybean acreage is blooming compared with 12 percent last year and 20 percent for the 5-year average. Soybean condition also fell further and is now rated 14 percent good to excellent compared with 58 percent last year at this time.

Minnesota: Hot temperatures persisted across the state early in the week, according to the USDA, NASS, Minnesota Field Office. Statewide average temperatures were nearly 9° above normal and set records at several reporting stations. More seasonable temperatures returned by the weekend, and thunderstorms crossed northern Minnesota. As of July 8, topsoil moisture supplies were rated 60 percent adequate to surplus, down from 78 percent a week earlier. Precipitation amounts varied and most southwestern areas remained dry. The greatest weekly precipitation total was over 4 inches reported in Aitkin. Statewide, 6.0 days were rated suitable for fieldwork. Forty-one percent of corn was silking and beyond, compared to 0 percent last year and 8 percent for the five year average. Corn condition was rated 1 percent very poor, 4 percent poor, 18 percent fair, 62 percent good, and 15 percent excellent. Soybeans blooming advanced to 57 percent, compared to 12 percent last year, and 21 percent average. Three percent of soybeans were setting pods. Soybean condition was rated 1 percent very poor, 6 percent poor, 21 percent fair, 64 percent good, and 8 percent excellent.

South Dakota:With little or no moisture received for parts of the state, crop conditions once again saw no improvements. Dry conditions allowed for 6.7 days suitable for field work. Major activities last week included harvesting of winter wheat and oats, hauling water for livestock, spraying for weeds and insects, caring for livestock, and cutting hay. This report was based on information from regional extension educators, Farm Service Agency county directors, and other reporters across the state. Another very hot and mostly dry early part of the week finally gave way to some cooler conditions later in the week. Unfortunately, rain was still very isolated. Crops continue to deal with very dry soil conditions as a result of the continuing dry and warm conditions. Isolated thunderstorms did provide some relief in various areas of the state. Overall precipitation was again very limited helping little with overall drought conditions. Areas in the far northwest and parts of the southwest were the biggest winners of the week. Most of the row crop area received little precipitation. Buffalo received the most for the week at 1.31 inches. Thirteen stations reported no precipitation for the week. Another nine stations received less than 0.10 inches. Many locations have 2-3 inch deficits for the growing season. Temperatures for the week averaged from the upper 70’s to the low 80’s with most of the state reaching triple digit highs again. These averages ranged from a few degrees above average across the north to over 8° F above average in the southeast. The highest temperature was 108o F at Pickstown. The lowest reported was 51o F at Custer and Mobridge. The US Drought Monitor map increased coverage in the state. Nearly the whole state was listed in some level of dryness. Most of the south, far west and Aberdeen areas were at D1 (Moderate Drought). Small areas of D2 (Severe Drought) were around the Black Hills. Topsoil moisture was rated at 27 percent in adequate to surplus, 41 percent short and 32 percent very short. Subsoil moisture was rated at 29 percent adequate to surplus, 44 percent short and 27 percent very short. Corn had an average height of 55 inches, ahead of the five year average of 37 inches. Twenty-four percent of corn was in the silk stage, with 87 percent having been cultivated or sprayed twice. Soybeans were at 45 percent blooming. Sorghum had 4 percent of the crop headed, ahead of the five year average of 2 percent.


 

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