State Winter Wheat Crop Summaries: Planting Picks Up

September 25, 2012 01:16 AM
 

Following are details from the state Crop/Weather Report:

 

Kansas: Kansas producers saw another cool week last week, but a return to dry conditions after some decent moisture earlier in the month, as only light amounts of precipitation were reported in a few areas of the state. Only ten of 52 stations received any measurable rain, led by Ottawa with just 0.55 inch. All but eight reporting stations showed at or below normal temperatures for the week. Weekly high temperatures ranged from 98 degrees in Beloit to 82 degrees at Garnett, while weekly lows were in the 30’s and 40’s with Holton recording the lowest at 32 degrees. Kansas producers averaged 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork, with only the Southeast District having less than 6 days suitable. Topsoil moisture supplies declined to 43 percent very short, 32 percent short, 25 percent adequate, and none surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies also showed a slight decrease and were rated as 57 percent very short, 31 percent short, 12 percent adequate, and none surplus. They were also preparing fields and seeding winter wheat with hopes of receiving some precipitation. Seventeen percent of the Kansas wheat acreage had been seeded by Sunday, identical to the 17 percent for both last year and the 5-year average, while 2 percent of the crop has already emerged.

Texas: Rainfall was spotty around the state last week. Areas of East and South Texas, the Panhandle, and the Edwards Plateau received most of the precipitation, with some locations reporting two inches or more for the week. Portions of Central and West Texas received little or no rainfall. Weather conditions last week were favorable for small grains seeding in many parts of the state. Many producers were taking advantage of improved soil moisture to get seed in the ground. Others were still waiting to plant and were busy applying pre-plant fertilizers and plowing. Some early-sown winter wheat was beginning to emerge in areas of North Texas.

Oklahoma: Little to no rain fell across Oklahoma over the past week. Most of the Mesonet stations received no measurable rainfall, with a few showers in the northeast. Moisture from September 1st through the 23rd was below normal across the state, averaging 41 percent of normal precipitation during the crucial start to fall planting. Although the past week was very dry, moisture from showers the week before gave some producers the opportunity to plant wheat and canola. Some dusted in wheat while others are waiting for additional moisture before making planting decisions. The continuing drought meant no significant improvements to row crop conditions. Livestock producers were still in need of moisture for stock ponds and to increase the potential for small grain grazing this winter. Topsoil moisture conditions declined from the week prior, with 11 percent rated adequate. Subsoil moisture conditions declined slightly, with 96 percent of the state rated short to very short. There were 6.4 days suitable for field work. Planting continued, taking advantage of moisture from the week prior, where available. Wheat seedbed preparation was 77 percent complete by the end of the week, and 21 percent was planted, on track with the five-year average.

Nebraska: For the week ending September 23, 2012, cooler temperatures and limited rainfall aided crop drydown and harvest progress across the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Winter wheat seeding was nearing the half way point but fields were slow to emerge due to dry soil conditions. Small amounts of precipitation were recorded along some border counties, but most areas of the state received no rain. Temperatures averaged near normal in the western third of the state, 2 to 4 degrees below normal in the central third, and 6 to 7 degrees below normal in the eastern third. Highs were in the lower 90’s and lows were mainly in the mid 30’s with some locations receiving the first frost of the season. For the week ending September 23, 2012, cooler temperatures and limited rainfall aided crop drydown and harvest progress across the state, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service, Nebraska Field Office. Winter wheat seeding was nearing the half way point but fields were slow to emerge due to dry soil conditions. Small amounts of precipitation were recorded along some border counties, but most areas of the state received no rain. Temperatures averaged near normal in the western third of the state, 2 to 4 degrees below normal in the central third, and 6 to 7 degrees below normal in the eastern third. Highs were in the lower 90’s and lows were mainly in the mid 30’s with some locations receiving the first frost of the season.

Colorado: Colorado was dry with above average temperatures last week. Topsoil and subsoil conditions remain rated mostly very short. Farmers were allowed 6.6 days in the field for operations. Planting of winter wheat progressed at a rapid pace last week with 42 percent of the acreage planted by the end of the week. Emergence reached 5 percent last week compared with 17 percent for the 5-year average.


 

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