USDA: Text Highlights, June Crop Production Report

June 12, 2013 06:14 AM
 

 

Crop Comments:

Winter wheat: Production is forecast at 1.51 billion bushels, up 2 percent from the May 1 forecast but down 8 percent from 2012. Based on June 1 conditions, the United States yield is forecast at 46.1 bushels per acre, up 0.7 bushel from last month but down 1.1 bushels from last year. As of June 2, thirty-two percent of the winter wheat crop in the 18 major producing States was rated in good to excellent condition, 20 percentage points below the same week in 2012. Nationally, 73 percent of the winter wheat crop was headed by June 2, seven percentage points behind the 5-year average pace.

Forecasted head counts from the objective yield survey in the six Hard Red Winter States (Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas) are below last year's levels in all States except Kansas and Oklahoma. Although some precipitation was received across much of the Plains during May, it was not enough to relieve the drought conditions plaguing the region.

Forecasted head counts from the objective yield survey in the three Soft Red Winter States (Illinois, Missouri, and Ohio) are above last year's levels in Illinois and Missouri but below in Ohio. Excessive spring precipitation in Illinois and Missouri reduced crop conditions during May.

Forecasted head counts from the objective yield survey in Washington are above last year. The Washington crop was rated in mostly fair to good condition as of June 2; however, precipitation is needed.

May Agricultural Summary

Below average temperatures coupled with heavy rainfall throughout May hampered fieldwork and crop development across much of the Midwest. Most notably, portions of the northern Great Plains and Mississippi Valley States accumulated more than 10 inches of precipitation during the month. Conversely, much of the Southwest totaled 0.1 inch or less, forcing some producers to irrigate their crops earlier than normal. Freezing overnight temperatures damaged portions of the developing winter wheat crop as far south as northern Texas during early-May, while daytime highs climbed to the triple digits in portions of the southern Great Plains mid-month.

As May began, cool, wet weather continued to hamper fieldwork throughout much of the major corn-producing regions, allowing producers only small windows of favorable conditions to plant this year's crop. By May 5, producers had planted 12 percent of the Nation's crop, 57 percentage points behind last year and 35 percentage points behind the 5-year average. This represented the slowest planting pace since 1984. Weather conditions improved somewhat during mid-May; however, many areas continued to report fields that were unable to support farm equipment due to surplus moisture. The unusually slow planting pace coupled with cooler than normal temperatures resulted in limited seed germination in some corn fields during the first half of the month. Warmer temperatures and limited precipitation provided producers in many areas ample time for fieldwork during the week ending May 19, evidenced by record-tying planting progress of 43 percentage points. Similarly, double-digit emergence occurred in 13 of the 18 major estimating States during the same week. Despite the return of wet weather in portions of the Corn Belt, planting continued to gain speed toward month's end, and jumped ahead of normal in 6 of the 18 major estimating States during the week ending May 26. Nationwide, 91 percent of this year's corn crop was planted by June 2, nine percentage points behind last year and 4 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Seventy-four percent of the crop had emerged, 22 percentage points behind last year and 8 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Overall, 63 percent of the corn crop was reported in good to excellent condition on June 2, compared with 72 percent from the same period last year.

As May began, soybean producers were just beginning to plant this year's crop. Progress was most advanced in the lower Mississippi Valley States, but was well behind normal due to unfavorable planting conditions earlier this spring. By May 12, six percent of the Nation's soybean crop was planted, 37 percentage points behind last year and 18 percentage points behind the 5-year average. This represented the slowest planting pace since 1993. Favorable mid-month weather allowed some producers in the Corn Belt enough time to finish planting corn and switch their focus to soybeans. By May 19, twenty-four percent of the Nation's crop was planted, 47 percentage points behind last year and 18 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Three percent of the crop had emerged. Double-digit planting progress was evident in many States during the week ending May 26. Despite improved conditions, producers Nationwide had planted just 57 percent of this year's soybean crop by June 2, representing the slowest pace since 1996 when 45 percent of the crop was planted on June 2. Emergence had advanced to 31 percent, 45 percentage points behind last year and 18 percentage points behind the 5-year average.

Unseasonably cool early-month temperatures limited crop development in many of the major winter wheat-producing States, leading to the slowest heading pace since 1993. By May 5, twenty percent of the crop was at or beyond the heading stage, 44 percentage points behind last year and 19 percentage points behind the 5-year average. In Texas, winter wheat fields damaged by dry, windy, or freezing conditions were baled for hay. Reports from Kansas indicated that just under half of the winter wheat crop was free of freeze damage on May 12 following cold temperatures in late-April and early-May. Producers in portions of southern Texas began harvesting wheat for grain mid-month, but progress remained behind normal. Elsewhere, fields in the Pacific Northwest were in need of additional moisture to aid crop development despite mid-month showers. By June 2, heading of the Nation's winter wheat crop was 73 percent complete, 15 percentage points behind last year and 7 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Lingering drought in western Oklahoma hampered crop development and delayed harvest. Overall, 32 percent of the winter wheat crop was reported in good to excellent condition on June 2, compared with 32 percent on May 5 and 52 percent from the same time last year.

By May 5, spring wheat producers had sown 23 percent of this year's crop, 59 percentage points behind last year and 27 percentage points behind the 5-year average. By May 12, seeding delays of over three weeks and over two weeks were evident in Minnesota and North Dakota, respectively, due to unseasonable weather conditions and limited fieldwork. Crop emergence significantly lagged the normal pace due to limited seeding and poor growing conditions in some of the larger producing States. Seeding was complete or nearly complete in Idaho and Washington by May 19, while favorable weather promoted rapid seeding in Minnesota, Montana, and the Dakotas. Toward month's end, seeding in the northern Great Plains was limited to fields that could support equipment. Nationally, 80 percent of the spring wheat crop was seeded by June 2, twenty percentage points behind last year and 12 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Sixty-one percent of the crop had emerged, 38 percentage points behind last year and 19 percentage points behind the 5-year average. Overall, 64 percent of the spring wheat crop was reported in good to excellent condition on June 2, compared with 78 percent from the same period last year.


 

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