Will Mother Nature Push Indiana Into the Record Yield Zone?

August 21, 2018 10:53 AM
 
According to Eric Miller, an area agronomist with Pioneer, perfect weather will be necessary to help the corn and soybean crops meet their full potential.

Heading into the second day of the Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour, all eyes are on Indiana as scouts on the eastern leg make their way through muddy fields. According to Eric Miller, an area agronomist with Pioneer, perfect weather will be necessary to help the corn and soybean crops meet their full potential. 

“I think it's poised to be a really good corn crop,” Miller told U.S. Farm Report Host Tyne Morgan on Tuesday night in Indianapolis. “My concern at this point in time is to finish grain fill. There are some inconsistencies out in the field that I'd like to see come full circle and in a really good, strong finish.  The grain-fill period in the last two weeks of its life are going to be key to extending that and getting full potential out of this corn crop.”

To maximize grain fill, corn in Indiana will need cool nighttime temperatures, cool daytime temperatures and moisture. Luckily, it rained most of the day on Monday in large swaths of Indiana, and the forecast through the end of the week indicates temperatures will cooperate.  

“I really think that those factors along with the stand counts we have out there could lend itself to really good crop,” Miller said. 

When it comes to soybeans, Miller’s main concern is keeping the crop standing and the photosynthetic area functioning, filling bean pods. 

“Some of these beans have gotten really tall. We had great early season growing conditions, but they are starting to get a little lazy,” he explained. “I'd like to see them stay standing really well to finish pod fill. We've got a great start to a lot of those pods. I just [hope] that we have good growing conditions here the next two to three weeks to finish out the whole season.”

Similar to farmer reports, Miller has seen a fair amount of tip back in the corn he’s scouted. He blames heat during pollination, which for much of Indiana was the first week of July. Still, he doesn’t expect the tip back to heavily impact yield. 

“The kernel counts are still really good. I don't think that it's a tremendous detriment to the overall crop; we still have the ears to justify a big crop even with some tip,” he said. “I think the crop is poised for a really strong finish. I think it's gonna be really close to what we had last year.” 

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