Winter Wheat Conditions Improve Across Southern Plains

March 11, 2014 06:21 AM
 

 

 

According to state crop reports, the condition of the winter wheat crops across the Southern Plains improved from last week, especially in Kansas and Texas. While less of the crop in Oklahoma is rated "good" to "excellent" compared to last week, less is also rated "poor" to "very poor," as the "fair" category increased by nine percentage points. Below is a table that includes crop condition ratings from the respective state statisticians.

Crop condition
Very Poor
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Kansas -
03/09/14
5
13
45
35
2
03/02/14
4
18
44
32
2
 
Okla. -
03/09/14
8
23
47
20
2
03/02/14
6
25
38
28
3
 
Texas -
03/09/14
11
20
41
24
4
03/02/14
16
30
39
14
1

Here are some of the key observations in the state monthly summaries:

Kansas: For the week ending March 9, 2014, cold, dry conditions prevailed across most of Kansas, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. Snow and ice early in the week in south central and southwest areas of Kansas accounted for limited precipitation with most totals half inch or less. Average temperatures in the eastern half of the State were more than 15 degrees below normal in some areas, while near normal temperatures were recorded in the far northwest. Winter wheat has started to green in a few areas. There were 2.9 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 16 percent very short, 33 short, 50 adequate, and 1 surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 19 percent very short, 35 short, 46 adequate, and 0 surplus.

Oklahoma: Another winter storm brought snow, sleet and freezing rain to Oklahoma last week. North Central Oklahoma received the most snow, with localized reports as high as 5-7 inches in parts of Grant and Alfalfa Counties. According to the most recent Drought Monitor, Oklahoma drought conditions are holding steady compared to the previous week because of the small amounts of moisture received. Temperatures were unseasonably cold this past week. Buffalo reached a low of -7 degrees on Monday, March 3rd, the lowest recorded temperature in March since 1948. During the latter part of the week Oklahoma received some more rain and snow, just enough to disrupt fieldwork slightly. Topsoil moisture conditions were rated 27 percent adequate to surplus and 73 percent short to very short. Subsoil moisture conditions were rated 19 percent adequate to surplus and 81 percent short to very short. There were only 5.0 days suitable for fieldwork. All small grains were rated mostly fair to poor.

Texas: Cold temperatures returned early last week, as a winter storm brought a variety of precipitation ranging from ice to snow and sleet to rain in many areas of Texas. Warmer temperatures were seen toward the end of the week. 1-2 inches of precipitation was observed in the Upper Coast and the Coastal Bend. The remainder of the state received precipitation ranging from a trace up to 1 inch. Wheat suffered from the effects of cold temperatures in the Northern Low Plains. Producers in the Cross Timbers reported that cold temperatures have slowed development of wheat. Cold temperatures continued to delay the oat crop in the Edwards Plateau.


 

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