Results: 170 Records found.
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    Some Plus Signs

    May 17, 2019 03:24 PM

    On the heels of last week’s column titled “Low Prices Cure Low Prices” we see some large plus signs in the corn and wheat rows of our table. Wheat export business has picked up, and speculative funds are covering their huge shorts in the grains. Bad news failed to move soybeans lower, although they were having some second thoughts on Friday.

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    Low Prices Cure Low Prices

    May 10, 2019 03:56 PM

    One of the basic axioms of the commodities market is that low prices cure low prices. When prices dip below the cost of production, production tends to slow because producers switch to alternative commodities or cut corners on inputs. Consumption tends to rise as the product becomes more affordable and broadens the audience of potential buyers. Eventually (a key word here) the consumption outstrips production and stocks begin to shrink.

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    A Few Blooms

    May 03, 2019 05:33 PM

    Last week’s Market Watch led off with the saying that April showers bring May flowers. This week we saw a few tender bullish blooms, with corn up 3.4% and Minneapolis spring wheat up 0.3%. However, some of the other flowers must have been frozen off by a late cold snap. Soybeans were down 2.8%, cotton was down 2.6% and feeder cattle sank 4.7%. In general, first of month asset allocation moves explained the action, with profit taking in cattle and hogs and bottom picking in corn and wheat.

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    April Showers Bring May Flowers

    Apr 26, 2019 03:40 PM

    Every country has their weather sayings. The US is full of them, from “make hay when the sun shines” to “if you don’t like the weather in (insert location) wait 30 minutes and it’ll change”. To buck up spirits of yet another day spent inside due to rain, mud or snow, Moms and Grandmas have also reminded generations that April showers bring (are followed by) May flowers. In other words, things are going to get better seasonally. A lot of US ag producers are hoping the saying is right on target.

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Results: 170 Records found.