Tax Tips from the Farm CPA

It's no secret farmers are experts at stretching a dollar. But when it comes to taxes, the write-offs you think are saving you money could come back to bite you. Below are some tax tips and advice from the Farm CPA, Paul Neiffer.

 


5 Tax Trips for Spring

By Nate Birt

As U.S. taxpayers prepare their returns ahead of April’s filing deadline, producers are thinking about taxes, too. Rather than focusing on the next few weeks, though, farmers need to think about future generations of their family to make smart tax choices for themselves, their businesses and their legacy.

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Tax Tips: The Silver Lining of Red Ink

By Ben Potter

 

Seeing red ink on the balance sheet is not fun, but for those farmers and ranchers who need help, The Farm CPA Paul Neiffer has some salient tax advice.

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Tax Tips: Don't Sleep on this Crop Insurance Option

By Jo Windmann

Crop insurance is a never-ending struggle between being cost-effective and having ample coverage. Paul Neiffer believes there might be a glimmer of hope in a fairly new program and clears up misperceptions that might bring a pleasant surprise to many farmers currently in the ARC program.

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Tax Tips: How Deferred Payment Contracts Work

By Nate Birt

If farmers end up prepaying too much on farm expenses, they might consider taking advantage of a deferred payment contract, says Paul Neiffer, CPA and principal at CliftonLarsonAllen, and AgWeb.com’s The Farm CPA blogger.

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Tax Tips: Why You Should Care About Carryback

By Ben Potter

In this current down market, farmers have a few secret tax weapons they can deploy, including something called carryback. Paul Neiffer, CPA with CliftonLarsonAllen and author of The Farm CPA blog on AgWeb, explains.

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Tax Tips: Succession Planning and Tax Reform Outlook

By Nate Birt

For most producers reviewing their farm’s succession plan, it makes good sense to avoid any major changes as 2016 ends and a new year begins. That’s according to Paul Neiffer, CPA and principal at CliftonLarsonAllen and author of the AgWeb.com blog The Farm CPA.

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