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How To Produce 100-Bushel Soybeans

July 31, 2014
By: Betsy Jibben, Ag Day TV National Reporter
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For soybean growers, 100 bushels per acre is something some farmers are starting to strive for. It’s not just only to achieve better yields, but for more money in their pocketbooks.

We talked with the first grower to produce 100 bushel soybeans in Arkansas as he tells us how he did it.

As combines rolled last fall in Arkansas, the yield monitor struck gold. Three farmers hit 100 bushels an acre. Nelson Crow was one of them.

Watch the full report from Soybean College:

"My phone blew up that day. I wanted to turn it off. Everyone was calling," said Arkansas farmer, Nelson Crow.

This week Crow attended Farm Journal’s Soybean College to share some of his secrets. First, prior to planting, he sprayed his field with a burn-down herbicide to control weeds.

"We sprayed nothing at planting and planted the seed on April 20 of that year," said Crow.

Crow didn’t spray again until 10 days after he planted, but there are a couple of other factors involved.

"I won’t plant a seed without fungicides on it. I will not go into the year without soil tests," said Crow.

Crow didn’t just do it on his own. He also had some additional help thanks to Mother Nature.

"We’ve had lack of insects and cool weather. That’s what’s driving yield increases," said Crow.

Favorable weather conditions or not, agronomists say achieving 100 bushel beans is still possible.

"Your first step is understanding the yield components and how the plant actually works if you want the plant to make 100 bushels per acre," said Farm Journal Field Agronomist, Missy Bauer.

Crow says the key to his success is just planning ahead.

"I think it was in February. We decided what seeds to plant and what field and fertilizers we were getting soil tested in. {We even go as far as} what chemicals to spray," said Crow.

Crow is hoping to leave a bigger mark. Who knows, maybe even set another record.

It was really good. I was really glad. It happened on my grandfather’s land," said Crow.

Crow says even with the higher input costs, he’s making an additional $80 per acre. He plants 140,000 plants per acre on 30 inch rows.

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RELATED TOPICS: Soybeans, Crops, Production

 
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